Carlsen – Caruana World Chess Championship 2018 GAME 6 DRAW!


The deadlock is yet to be broken. The sixth game of the World Championship match saw Magnus Carlsen use 1.e4 for the first time and, predictably, Fabiano Caruana responded with the Petroff Defence. What seemed to be a boring position that would unavoidably lead to a draw turned into a real fight when Caruana opened the centre. Carlsen ended up suffering to secure a draw after sacrificing a piece for two pawns. EFSTRATIOS GRIVAS and LAWRENCE TRENT analysed the game. | Photos: Nadia Panteleeva / World Chess

 

Magnus Carlsen (norvég, 2835) – Fabiano Caruana (amerikai, 2832) 3 - 3

A brit fővárosban a 12 játszmásra tervezett páros mérkőzés félidejében a világbajnok Magnus Carlsen és a kihívó Fabiano Caruana párharca hat döntetlennel 3-3-ra áll. A mérkőzés hatodik partija 80 lépésben ért véget pontosztozkodással.
A szombati pihenőnapot követően a vasárnapi hetedik játszmában is Carlsen játszik világossal.

(Fabiano Caruana – Magnus Carlsen döntetlen (Szicíliai védelem, 115)Magnus Carlsen – Fabiano Caruana döntetlen (Vezércsel, 49)
Fabiano Caruana – Magns Carlsen döntetlen (Szicíliai védelem, 49)
Magnus Carlsen – Fabiano Caruana döntetlen (Angol megnyitás, 34)
Fabiano Caruana – Magnus Carlsen döntetlen (Szicíliai védelem, 34))
Magnus Carlsen – Fabiano Caruana döntetlen (Orosz huszárjáték, 80))

 

 

 

Garry Kasparov The computer shows Black wins with 68..Bh4 here. But had Caruana played the incredible 69.Bd5 Ne2 70.Bf3 Ng1!! they would request metal detectors immediately! No human can willingly trap his own knight like that.

Carlsen - Caruana World Chess Championship 2018 GAME 6 DRAW!

Nakamura on Carlsen's save: "Unreal. Most unbelievable draw by him."

NEXT GAME: Game 7 Nov 18, 2018 15:00


Carlsen-Caruana World Chess Championship 2018

Game 6 Nov 16, 2018 15:00
Game 7 Nov 18, 2018 15:00
Game 8 Nov 19, 2018 15:00
Game 9 Nov 21, 2018 15:00
Game 10 Nov 22, 2018 15:00
Game 11 Nov 24, 2018 15:00
Game 12 Nov 26, 2018 15:00


Carlsen-Caruana FIDE World Chess Championship 2018 LIVE PGN >

Henrik Carlsen on NRK: "Magnus feels that Caruana is playing in a way that makes him comfortable. He is in no hurry to score yet.


NOS SPORT

Carlsen-Caruana World Chess Championship 2018 GAME 6 report

[Event "FIDE-Wch M"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.16"] [Round "6"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C42"] [WhiteElo "2835"] [BlackElo "2832"] [Annotator "Efstratios Grivas"] [PlyCount "160"] [EventDate "2018.11.09"] [EventType "match"] [EventRounds "12"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "FIDE-Wch M-M 2018"] [Source "Grivas CIA"] [SourceDate "2018.11.09"] [SourceVersion "1"] [SourceVersionDate "2018.11.09"] [SourceQuality "1"] 1. e4 {So, the WC seems quite unpredictable! In game 2 he chose 1.d4, in game 3 1.c4 and now 1.e4!} e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 {Nothing less to be expected by the Challenger - he has made his living by the 'Petroff Defence'!} 3. Nxe5 d6 { (D) [#]} 4. Nd3 ({A quit unusual line. Their most recent game went} 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Nc3 Nxc3 6. dxc3 Be7 7. Be3 Nc6 8. Bc4 O-O 9. Qd2 Bf5 10. O-O-O Qd7 11. Kb1 Rfe8 12. h4 Bf8 13. h5 h6 14. Be2 Bg4 15. Nh2 Bxe2 16. Qxe2 Ne5 17. Bc1 Qc6 18. f4 Nc4 19. Qd3 Qe4 20. g4 Ne3 21. Rde1 Qxd3 22. cxd3 Nd5 23. Reg1 Re6 24. g5 Ne7 25. gxh6 Rxh6 26. f5 Rh7 27. Ng4 Kh8 28. f6 Ng8 29. fxg7+ Rxg7 30. Be3 c5 31. Bf4 Re8 32. Ne3 Rxg1+ 33. Rxg1 Re6 {½-½ Carlsen,M-Caruana,F Saint Louis 2018. But it was expected that M.Carlsen will come with something new, but not that early... I would say that M.Carlsen is more interesting to his physical strength and stamina than to try to get something in the opening from his very well-prepared opponent…}) 4... Nxe4 5. Qe2 Qe7 {(D) [#]} 6. Nf4 ({Another rare line chosen by the WC. There are quite a few games with} 6. Nc3 Nf6 7. Nf4 (7. b3 Nc6 8. Bb2 Bf5 9. Nf4 O-O-O 10. Qxe7 Nxe7 11. O-O-O Ng6 $11 {So, W-Caruana,F Saint Louis 2018}) 7... c6 8. f3 g5 9. Nd3 $11 {Ganguly,S-Abasov,N Ulaanbaatar 2018.}) 6... Nc6 (6... Nf6 {, seems also safe:} 7. d4 Qxe2+ 8. Bxe2 Nc6 9. c3 g6 10. f3 Bg7 11. h4 h5 12. Na3 Ne7 13. Nb5 Kd8 14. Kf2 a6 $11 { Motylev,A-Rakhmanov,A Yaroslavl 2018.}) 7. Nd5 Nd4 $1 8. Nxe7 Nxe2 9. Nd5 (9. Bxe2 Bxe7 {, promises nothing to both sides!}) 9... Nd4 {(D) [#]} 10. Na3 ({ A novelty to} 10. Bd3 Nc5 $1 (10... Nxf2 $2 11. Kxf2 Kd8 12. b3 $18 {Seyb, A-Gaier,R Willingen 2001}) 11. Nxc7+ Kd7 12. Nxa8 Nxd3+ 13. cxd3 Nc2+ 14. Kd1 Nxa1 $13 {.}) 10... Ne6 11. f3 N4c5 12. d4 Nd7 13. c3 c6 14. Nf4 Nb6 {(D) [#] Black seems to have solved with success all his opening 'problems', for the sixth time in 6 games in this match! Probably all seconds of both players should be send to vacations, as they do not really seem to be needed! It is the first WC that I am following, without any strong 'feelings' in the opening phase! Well, this is a well-known pawn structure, mainly coming from the ‘Exchange Variation’ of the ‘French Defence’ (1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 exd5). There is a clear drawn tendency, mainly because there are not many good pawn breaks and as some pieces can rapidly be exchanged, there is not much play left. But of course we must keep I mind that an equal position is not necessary a drawn one; mistakes need to be made and explored in order to have a decisive result. And this can happen in any position…} 15. Bd3 d5 16. Nc2 Bd6 17. Nxe6 Bxe6 18. Kf2 {(D) [#]} h5 ({A good reaction. White could be slightly better after} 18... f5 $6 19. Re1 Kf7 20. g3 Rhe8 21. b3 g6 22. Ne3 $14 {.}) 19. h4 Nc8 {Planning the simple ...Ne7 and ...Bf5, with full equality. } 20. Ne3 Ne7 21. g3 {(D) [#]} c5 $1 {Active and good play by Black.} 22. Bc2 ( 22. dxc5 Bxc5 23. Kg2 d4 24. cxd4 Bxd4 {, is fine for Black.}) 22... O-O 23. Rd1 Rfd8 24. Ng2 cxd4 25. cxd4 Rac8 26. Bb3 Nc6 {Again a fine idea, trying to harass the b3-bishop.} 27. Bf4 Na5 28. Rdc1 {(D) [#] The position seemed to be so boring to spectators, that most of them started to talk about, religion, Trump and other irrelevant things, while watching the game…} {White is dreaming of getting a better ending with the knight vs the e6-bishop, but Black of course is not interested to!} Bb4 $1 {Preserving the darksquared bishops is essential.} 29. Bd1 ({White cannot go for} 29. Bc7 Nxb3 30. axb3 Re8 31. Rxa7 Bd6 32. Rxb7 Re7 33. Bxd6 Rxb7 34. Rxc8+ Bxc8 35. b4 Rd7 36. Bc5 Ba6 { , as only Black can have winning chances here.}) 29... Nc4 30. b3 Na3 31. Rxc8 Rxc8 32. Rc1 Nb5 33. Rxc8+ Bxc8 {(D) [#] The position seems to be dead equal, but from now on M.Carlsen is not on his best...} 34. Ne3 $6 ({Troubles start! Good is} 34. Bb8 a6 35. Nf4 $11 {.}) 34... Nc3 35. Bc2 {(D) [#]} Ba3 $1 { White's queenside pawn structure seems to be in trouble...} 36. Bb8 $6 ({ Black seems to be doing good after} 36. Bd3 Be6 (36... Nxa2 $6 37. Nxd5 Nb4 38. Nxb4 Bxb4 39. Ke2 $11) 37. Nc2 Bb2 38. a4 Na2 $15 {.}) 36... a6 37. f4 {(D) [#] } Bd7 $1 38. f5 Bc6 ({Obviously better than} 38... Nb5 $6 39. Nxd5 Nxd4 40. Bd1 $11 {.}) 39. Bd1 Bb2 ({With handsight I would have gone for an ending with the bishop pair after} 39... Nxd1+ 40. Nxd1 f6 $15 {. Well, the presence of the central pawns is not helping Black, but White will have to defend accurately. But Black's move is stronger.}) 40. Bxh5 {(D) [#]} Ne4+ $2 ({The notorious 40th move!} 40... Nxa2 $1 {, can be dangerous:} 41. Ba7 Nc3 42. Bb6 Nb5 43. Nc2 Nd6 $1 (43... Bd7 $2 44. Bg4 Nd6 45. Ne3 Nc8 46. Bc7 Bxd4 47. Bf3 Bxf5 48. Bxd5 b5 49. Bb7 Bg4 50. Bxa6 Ne7 51. Be5 Ba7 52. Bb7 Nf5 53. Bf4 $11) 44. Bf3 (44. g4 Ne4+ 45. Ke2 Nf6 $17) 44... Nxf5 45. Bg4 Nd6 46. Nb4 Ne4+ $17 {.}) 41. Kg2 Bxd4 42. Bf4 Bc5 {(D) [#] Black still seems to be doing better, but White finds a radical, and quite far from obvious, solution.} 43. Bf3 $1 Nd2 {(D) [#] } 44. Bxd5 $1 ({An incredible solution to White's problems. Endless suffering is the passive} 44. Nf1 Nxf3 45. Kxf3 d4+ 46. Ke2 Bb5+ 47. Ke1 Bd3 $15 { . For me it is more than obvious that M.Carlsen's extreme and deep knowledge on various endings is the key point here - how else can you make such a radical decision?}) 44... Bxe3 45. Bxc6 Bxf4 46. Bxb7 Bd6 47. Bxa6 Ne4 { (D) [#] A consequence of forced moves after White's 44th.} 48. g4 {(D) [#]} ( 48. Kf3 Nxg3 49. Bd3 Nh5 50. a4 Bb4 51. Ke4 {, is another great story! The analysis is extremely difficult and in general I would say that White should hold here, but I can be proven wrong by some powerful engine!}) 48... Ba3 $1 { The only move - Black's wins the one of the two connected white queenside pawns.} 49. Bc4 Kf8 50. g5 Nc3 51. b4 $1 {It is important to retain an as far as it is possible outside pawn.} Bxb4 52. Kf3 Na4 53. Bb5 Nc5 54. a4 {(D) [#] So, White has just two pawns for the piece and he doesn't seem able to make any progress. But can Black win? And if yes, how? He will obviously need his king to capture the white a-pawn, but at the meantime Black will exchange the kingside pawns. I think that White can hold.} f6 55. Kg4 $1 {The white king has to stay on the kingside, protecting his pawns.} Ne4 56. Kh5 Be1 57. Bd3 Nd6 {(D) [#]} {White can also wait here - I cannot see how Black will radically improve, but M.Carlsen creates with his next a marvelous position - the straightest way to gain a fortress! This kind of thinking is of a legend player!} 58. a5 $1 Bxa5 59. gxf6 gxf6 60. Kg6 Bd8 61. Kh7 $1 {(D) [#] A very nice position for White! Some facts to understand it: 1. The white h-pawn shouldn’t move to h6. 2. The white king should be able to be retained to g6- and h7-squares. 3. The white bishop should be able to check the black king if he goes to f7. 4. Black can win if his king enters the h8- or f7-squares.} Nf7 62. Bc4 Ne5 63. Bd5 Ba5 64. h5 Bd2 65. Ba2 Nf3 66. Bd5 Nd4 {(D) [#]} 67. Kg6 $2 ({White blunders! Correct is} 67. Bc4 Bc3 68. Bd3 $11 {.}) 67... Bg5 68. Bc4 { (D) [#]} ({What else? If} 68. h6 Ne2 69. Kh7 Nf4 70. Be4 Nh3 71. Bh1 (71. Kg6 Kg8 $19) 71... Nf2 72. Bf3 Nd3 73. Be2 Ne5 74. Bh5 Nf7 $19 {, or}) (68. Be4 Kg8 $19 {.}) 68... Nf3 $2 ({And the favour is returned! Black could cash the point with some delicate manoeuvres:} 68... Bh4 $1 69. Bd5 Ne2 70. Bf3 Ng1 $1 71. Bd5 Bg5 72. Kh7 Ne2 73. Bf3 Ng3 74. Bg4 {(the bishop 'lost' the important a2-g8 diagonal)} Kf7 75. Kh8 Be3 76. Kh7 Bc5 77. Kh8 (77. Bd1 Nxf5 78. Bb3+ Ke7 79. Kg6 Nh4+ 80. Kg7 Bd4 $19) 77... Bf8 78. Kh7 Ne4 $19 {.}) 69. Kh7 {Back to business!} Ne5 70. Bb3 Ng4 71. Bc4 Ne3 72. Bd3 $1 ({But not} 72. Be6 $2 Bh4 73. Bd7 Nf1 74. Ba4 Ng3 75. Kg6 Kg8 $19 {. White must always keep in mind the notes after the 61st move and never fall into a zugzwang! Easier said than done!}) 72... Ng4 73. Bc4 Nh6 74. Kg6 {(D) [#] Black cannot make progress, so he decides to move with the king.} Ke7 75. Bb3 Kd6 76. Bc2 Ke5 77. Bd3 Kf4 78. Bc2 Ng4 79. Bb3 Ne3 80. h6 Bxh6 (80... Bxh6 {Draw agreed. White can draw with either} 81. Kxf6 {, or} (81. Kxh6 Nxf5+ 82. Kg6 Ke5 83. Bc2 {. The game looked as another dull case in the start, but quickly moved to a classic one! And what an endgame surprise by the great Magnus! Clocks: W: 3:13:43 - B: 3:12:44}) ) 1/2-1/2

Sky News anchor Kay Burley makes the first move

[Event "Carlsen - Caruana World Championship Match"] [Site "London ENG"] [Date "2018.11.15"] [EventDate "2018.11.15"] [Round "6"] [Result "½-½"] [White "Magnus Carlsen"] [Black "Fabiano Caruana"] [Annotator "hunonchess"] [ECO "C42"] [WhiteElo "2835"] [BlackElo "2832"] [PlyCount "29"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nd3 Nxe4 5. Qe2 Qe7 6. Nf4 Nc6 7. Nd5 Nd4 8. Nxe7 Nxe2 9. Nd5 Nd4 10. Na3 Ne6 11. f3 N4c5 12. d4 Nd7 13. c3 c6 14. Nf4 Nb6 15. Bd3 d5 16. Nc2 Bd6 17. Nxe6 Bxe6 18. Kf2 h5 19. h4 Nc8 20. Ne3 Ne7 21. g3 c5 22. Bc2 O-O 23. Rd1 Rfd8 24. Ng2 cxd4 25. cxd4 Rac8 26. Bb3 Nc6 27. Bf4 Na5 28. Rdc1 Bb4 29. Bd1 Nc4 30. b3 Na3 31. Rxc8 Rxc8 32. Rc1 Nb5 33. Rxc8+ Bxc8 34. Ne3 Nc3 35. Bc2 Ba3 36. Bb8 a6 37. f4 Bd7 38. f5 Bc6 39. Bd1 Bb2 40. Bxh5 Ne4+ 41. Kg2 Bxd4 42. Bf4 Bc5 43. Bf3 Nd2 44. Bxd5 Bxe3 45. Bxc6 Bxf4 46. Bxb7 Bd6 47. Bxa6 Ne4 48. g4 Ba3 49. Bc4 Kf8 50. g5 Nc3 51. b4 Bxb4 52. Kf3 Na4 53. Bb5 Nc5 54. a4 f6 55. Kg4 Ne4 56. Kh5 Be1 57. Bd3 Nd6 58. a5 Bxa5 59. gxf6 gxf6 60. Kg6 Bd8 61. Kh7 Nf7 62. Bc4 Ne5 63. Bd5 Ba5 64. h5 Bd2 65. Ba2 Nf3 66. Bd5 Nd4 67. Kg6 Bg5 68. Bc4 Nf3 69. Kh7 Ne5 70. Bb3 Ng4 71. Bc4 Ne3 72. Bd3 Ng4 73. Bc4 Nh6 74. Kg6 Ke7 75. Bb3 Kd6 76. Bc2 Ke5 77. Bd3 Kf4 78. Bc2 Ng4 79. Bb3 Ne3 80. h6 Bxh6 ½-½
WCh London
Caruana, Fabiano - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 115 B31 Sicilian Rossolimo
Carlsen, Magnus - Caruana, Fabiano ½-½ 49 D37 QGD 5.Bf4
Caruana, Fabiano - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 49 B31 Sicilian Rossolimo
Carlsen, Magnus - Caruana, Fabiano ½-½ 34 A29 English Four Knights
Caruana, Fabiano - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 34 B31 Sicilian Rossolimo
Carlsen, Magnus - Caruana, Fabiano ½-½ 80 C42 Petroff's Defence
 
WCh London (ENG), 09-26 xi 2018
Name Ti NAT Rtng 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total Perf
Caruana, Fabiano g USA 2832 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ . . . . . . 3 2835
Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2835 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ . . . . . . 3 2832
Kay Burley launches the debate we all have been waiting for: the Petroff Defence.  

Game 6 is off! This is Magnus Carlsen's first 1.e4 of the match

Sviidler: "This is one of the more peculiar openings I've seen in a while!"

And it's happened - the Petroff!

Holy cow!" was heard in the press room by a chess journalist when this position came on the board.

Carlsen és Caruana tanítja a gyerekeknek, hogy hogyan fejleszük a pacikat 🙂

huszár vágta a centrumban

Grischuk: "I have joined, but there is no real reason! It's a well-known line. Kovalev told me about it just recently during the Isle of Man tournament after our great Anti-Berlin Re1 & he said this 7...Nd4 just kills the line"

Game 6 in black and white

Hammer: "I am pretty sure Magnus has given up winning this."

Grischuk "Kramnik told me in France they're going to have a reality show. They'll put some cameras in the coffin & there'll just be a dead body in the coffin-lights & cameras. Twice per day 15 minutes on TV with highlights & 24/7 on internet. It's about as exciting as this game!"

This looks like a wasted white game for Carlsen. Draw is likely, but pretty sure he will be very disappointed afterwards. He had nothing

The way this game is going is exactly what Caruana's been doing in the Petroff all year - and winning - but he can he pull that off against Carlsen? Grischuk: "If [Magnus] loses this one it would just be unbelievable!"

Looks like this game is just another example in #CarlsenCaruana of how it's black that ends up creating some pressure to play for a win. "It looked dead and it might end in a draw, but it has definitely livened up", Svidler says.

Both players have made the time control with Black slightly better, though Grischuk notes that if Black's initiative dies away White can also be better long-term:

British poker player Liv Boeree at the live commentary studio during Round 6 Liv Boeree Profile 2018

Magnus has given up a piece for 3 pawns! Svidler: "It feels like more of a draw than a win, but Black has a risk-free advantage"

Caruana is now a piece up for three pawns (one of them will fall). While Carlsen may save a draw, this game must be a huge disappointment for him. A missed opportunity and the American will gain confidence.

If this Carlsen-Caruana endgame is drawn, then chess truly is a draw no matter what.

Magnus Carlsen on fortresses: "It's a good thing they exist, right?"    
Garry Kasparov ‏ The computer shows Black wins with 68..Bh4 here. But had Caruana played the incredible 69.Bd5 Ne2 70.Bf3 Ng1!! they would request metal detectors immediately! No human can willingly trap his own knight like that. Kaszparov írta , hogy ha Caruana megjátszotta volna a 68..Bh4. 69.Bd5 Ne2 70.Bf3 Ng1!!! változatot, akkor valszeg fémdetektoros vizsgálatot kellett volna kérni Caraunára, mivel zerinte nincs ember, aki ilyen módon csapdába lépett volna a pacival
De az is érdekes, 68. lépésben a Stockfish mattot jelentett 30 lépésben. A jelenlévő nagymesterek nem értették, pedig ott volt előttük a computer.

GAME R1-R5

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