Caruana – Carlsen World Chess Championship 2018 GAME 12 DRAW! November 28.Tiebreak


Caruana - Carlsen World Chess Championship 2018 GAME 12 DRAW!

JÖN A RÁJÁTSZÁS !

November 28.
Tiebreak

The playoff will be Wednesday at 3 p.m. local time, the same time as all the other rounds. The two will play four rapid games at 25+10. If tied 2-2, then a pair of blitz games at 5+3 will occur.

If still tied, another pair of blitz. The two would have to tie after five pairs of blitz games (10 total blitz games) before an Armageddon game would be played.

Kramnik: "It's a shame for Black to offer a draw in such position!"

WCh London (ENG), 09-26 xi 2018
Name Ti NAT Rtng 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total Perf
Caruana, Fabiano g USA 2832 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 6 2835
Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2835 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 6 2832

Záróünnepség


Carlsen-Caruana World Chess Championship 2018 GAME 12 report


Carlsen-Caruana World Chess Championship 2018


November 27.pihenő nap
November 28.
Tiebreak
Záróünnepség
A rájátsZás,Tiebreak

Szerdán 4 PARTI: 25-25 perces rapid játszma következik lépésenként 10 másodperc plusz idővel. Haa 4 partiis egyenlő végeredményű (2-2), akkor 2: 5-5 perces villámparti következik lépésenként 3 mp plusz idővel. Ezt a blitz oda-vissza-vágót addig játsszák, amíg el nem dől a dolog. De ha 5x2 után sem dől el, ami azért valljuk be már közel nulla valószínűségű, no akkor jön az armageddon.



A nyereményalap 1 millió dollár azaz 1 MILLIÓ DOLLÁR! Plusz a jegyárbevételekből adódó rész. A nyereményalapon a két játékos osztozik 60-40 arányban, ha a 12 normál időkontrollú partiban eldől a küzdelem. Ha csak a tiebreak dönt, akkor 55-45 arányban osztoznak.

Carlsen-Caruana FIDE WCCh 2018 LIVE PGN >

Folytatás NEXT Game PLAYOFF Nov 28, 2018 15:00 !

-17Days -6Hours -9Minutes -44Seconds
[Event "WCh 2018"] [Site "London ENG"] [Date "2018.11.26"] [Round "12"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteTitle "GM"] [BlackTitle "GM"] [WhiteElo "2832"] [BlackElo "2835"] [ECO "B33"] [Opening "Sicilian"] [Variation "Pelikan (Lasker/Sveshnikov) variation"] [Event "London 2018"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.07.30"] [Round "12"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B33"] [WhiteElo "2832"] [BlackElo "2835"] [PlyCount "62"] [EventDate "2018.08.25"] [SourceVersionDate "2018.07.30"] {The last game, where so much is at stake. If Fabiano wins he'll become the 17th world champion. All his tournaments, all the work of his life has been aimed at reaching this point. After accomplishing everything necessary to reach the goal of playing for the World Championship, Fabiano has survived eleven tough rounds to get to this last game. I cannot think of any game where there's so much to play for. Will we see Fabiano win the biggest game of his life? Or will we see Carlsen defend his title once again?} 1. e4 $1 {In the last few months and in tournaments before this one, Fabiano had been experimenting with 1.d4 or 1.c4. Although he had great results with White in some games in the Catalan or the Nimzo, that was just a distraction for Magnus to ponder. In this match of all matches, Fabiano will stick to his main opening 1.e4!} c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 {Shelving 3.Bb5, which has been played three times in this tournament.} cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 { As predicted by many people including myself, we see the Sveshnikov Sicilian for the last game. I'm sure many people were pleased to see such a sharp opening for the final game of the match. Magnus has strongh nerves. In order to be able to play such a sharp opening you have to come very well prepared; there are many pitfalls and traps that Black can easily fall into in the Sveshnikov. You have to have complete trust in your ability to calculate and assess the arising positions. Part of me wonders what would happen if Magnus employed 1...e5 in a game in this match.} 7. Nd5 (7. Bg5 {is the main move here by far. Fabiano has played this many times before, his most recent being a big win against Gata Kamsky in the 2017 US Championships.} a6 8. Na3 b5 9. Bxf6 gxf6 10. Nd5 {Now Black can play both 10...f5 or 10...Bg7. This complex variation used to be very popular. Just a few years ago Boris Gelfand and Teimour Radjabov were staunch defenders of this line. These days we'll probably see 7.Nd5 grow into popularity since everyone copies the top player's games.}) 7... Nxd5 8. exd5 Ne7 {While annotating game 8 for ChessBase, I wondered what would happen if Magnus chose 8...Ne7. Today we'll see exactly that.} ({The usual move} 8... Nb8 {was played in games 8 and 10.}) 9. c4 ({ Many years ago while reading Rogozenco's The Sveshnikov Reloaded book, I remember that 9.c3 was considered White's best. It gives White some extra options on the queenside.} 9. c3 {Now Black should probably play 9...Nf5 to keep d6 defended. If he tries} Ng6 $2 {it's a mistake since} (9... f5 $5 10. Qa4 Kf7 {is playable too, though White might be a bit better after} 11. Qb4) 10. Qa4 Bd7 11. Qc4 {is unpleasant. Especially after} Rc8 12. Qb4 {hitting the d6 and a7 pawns.}) 9... Ng6 10. Qa4 Bd7 {is a quick way to decide the last round game and head for the rapid playoffs. But if this happens we might see protesters and rioters in London, and the fans who paid tickets would definitely want a full refund. Playing top level chess is not easy, but fortunately Fabiano comes well prepared and ready to fight for an advantage.} 11. Qb4 Bf5 {The best move, I'm sure Magnus is still following his prep.} ({ The most natural move is} 11... Qb8 {It has been played 13 times in the past according to the ChessBase Live Book. Still it doesn't seem to equalize. White just has too much space.} 12. h4 h5 13. Be2 a6 14. Nc3 Be7 15. g3 $14 {for example here. I still like White, after making natural moves for both sides. It seems to me that White has an easier game and the knight on g6 is misplaced. }) ({Needless to say} 11... Bxb5 12. Qxb5+ Qd7 {has to be avoided. No one should give up the bishop pair without getting someting concrete in return.}) 12. h4 h5 $146 {Black pushes back and does not give White any more space to work with. Fabiano likes playing with a lot of space and it's dangerous to give him too much ground to work with. Coincidentally this is also a novelty according to my database.} (12... Be7 13. h5 Nf4 14. Be3 a6 15. Nc3 Nd3+ 16. Bxd3 Bxd3 17. Rd1) (12... a6 13. h5) 13. Qa4 {A provocative move and a typical strategy. By repeating the position twice a player can move the game closer to the time control on move 40. This allows him or her to have more time to think on critical positions. This makes more sense in complicated or unfamiliar openings like the Sveshnikov. In a Berlin 5.Re1 or a symmetrical Petroff it is perhaps unnecessary. But in this game it could be beneficial as we are in foreign territory at such an early stage of the game.} Bd7 14. Qb4 Bf5 15. Be3 {White gains time from creating threats on the queenside. I suppose he has to act quickly or else Black comfortably finishes his development. Then the construction of Black active pieces on the kingside guarantees counterplay. In that regard 15.Bg5 looks interesting too.} ({A slow move like} 15. Be2 { will not cut it, if White is looking for an advantage. After} Be7 16. g3 a6 17. Nc3 e4 {Black creates strong counterplay with Bf6 and Ne5 coming next.}) ({ It is tempting to disrupt Black's development with} 15. Bg5 {and with hindsight I would recommend this move. Black does not really want to play f6, and Be7 loses so} Qb8 {has to be played.} (15... Be7 $2 16. Bxe7 Kxe7 17. c5 { is bad for Black. Now his king is forced unto f6} dxc5 18. Qxc5+ Kf6 {And now 19.Nd6 leaves Black's king in a tough spot.} 19. Nd6 $16) 16. g3 (16. Qa5 $5 { is a deep computer move. The fun idea is that} b6 17. Qa4 Bd7 18. Bd3 {White wants to win quickly with Bf5 but} Be7 $1 {equalizes and takes out the fun.} ( 18... a6 19. Bf5 $1 {is tough to meet for Black.}) 19. Bxg6 fxg6 20. Bxe7 Kxe7 21. Qc2 Kf7 $11) 16... a6 17. Nc3 Be7 18. Be2 Qc7 {now we get a line very similar to the game, but Black has to spend two tempi moving his queen from b8 to c7. Also Fabiano avoids the possibility of 15...Be7 as could happen in his game. It does not look like there is much difference to the untrained eye, but in top level chess little things like this matter.}) 15... a6 {I wonder where both players preparation ended. I suspect it was a move ago. Here Black has another seemingly better (albeit more risky) option.} ({I like here} 15... Be7 {Black is going to get fast development and piece play for his pawn.} 16. Nxa7 (16. Bxa7 O-O 17. g3 b6 {the bishop on a7 is in a tricky spot.}) (16. g3 { Black can finish his development by castling or go 16...Be4 and 17...Bf3.}) 16... O-O {White has many possibilities now. It is not simple to defend over the board against Black's initiative. Perhaps} 17. Bb6 (17. g3 Be4 18. Rh2 Bf3 19. Nb5 f5 $1 {with attack.}) (17. Qxb7 $2 Qa5+ 18. b4 Qa3 $19) (17. Nb5 Nxh4) (17. Be2 Nf4) (17. a4 Nxh4 $13) 17... Qd7 18. Qb5 {is the safest in order to trade queens. The position is very complex.} Bd8 19. Qxd7 Bxd7 20. Bxd8 Rfxd8 21. Nb5 Bxb5 22. cxb5 Ra4 23. g3 Rc8 $13) 16. Nc3 Qc7 {Solid and simple.} ({ There is no need to go for assymetrical positions} 16... Be7 17. Qxb7 O-O 18. O-O-O Nxh4 19. Qb6 $14 {it feels that the h4 pawn is not as important as Black's b7 pawn.}) 17. g3 (17. Qa4+ Bd7 18. Qd1 Ne7) 17... Be7 18. f3 (18. Qa4+ Bd7 19. Qd1 Bg4 20. Be2 Bxe2 21. Qxe2) (18. Be2 Nf8) 18... Nf8 $1 {Optimal rearrangement of the pieces. In these kinds of positions you want to delay castling until White shows his hand. Castling short now will only tempt White to go for a full frontal kingside attack with Be2, and g4/f4 etc.} (18... O-O 19. Be2 Bd7 20. a4 $1 {With the queenside closed, White can focus on planning his kingside attack.} f5 21. f4 exf4 22. gxf4 {the position is complex, but it should be in White's favour.}) 19. Ne4 Nd7 (19... Bxe4 20. fxe4 Nd7 21. Bh3 $14 ) 20. Bd3 O-O ({Watching this game live I expected} 20... Bg6 {although perhaps it does not make much difference since Black has to castle sooner or later.}) 21. Rh2 $2 {No doubt the enormous tension of the last round of the World Championship match takes its toll on everyone. Both players start making mistakes. This has a nice idea to it, but it's too ambitious and simply does not work. White wants to play Rc2 and castle long, but this gives Magnus more than enough time and options to meet this plan. Fabiano gives the impression that he likes positions of opposite castled kings. Therefore this move does not come as a big surprise from him. It's just too ambitious.} ({White has to acquiesce and play the calmer} 21. O-O Bg6 22. Qd2 {when f5 is always met by Ng5. White can still try to fight for an advantage if Magnus is not careful.}) (21. O-O-O b5 $15 {castling queenside is unrealistic at this point.}) 21... Rac8 ({Or} 21... Bg6) 22. O-O-O Bg6 {Now f5 is coming and its unpleasant to meet it as White has no good way to prevent it. His best option now is to play calmly and brace for the coming storm.} 23. Rc2 ({I thought at first} 23. Kb1 { was better to keep the rook on the h-file for now.} f5 24. Ng5 Bxg5 25. hxg5 e4 26. fxe4 Ne5 27. Be2 {but still both Ng4 or fxe4 now is in Black's favour.}) 23... f5 24. Nf2 (24. Ng5 Bxg5 25. hxg5 e4) 24... Nc5 $17 {Black has seized a powerful initiative and is slowly taking over.} 25. f4 {Desperation, but what else? White hopes to at least keep the g6-bishop away from action.} (25. Bxc5 dxc5 26. Qe1 Rfe8 {as I said earlier no one really wants to give up the bishop pair unless necessary.}) 25... a5 {An automatic move in conjuction with a piece outpost on c5. I wonder if Magnus thought of or even considered b5 ideas here.} (25... exf4 26. Bxf4 b5 {looks powerful, and might be just close to winning.} 27. Qd2 {is the sternest defence, when Black can go 27...Bf6, or 27.. .Qb6. White's position is tough to defend and his consolation (asleep bishop on g6) is not enough to save him objectively. His pieces are just badly placed especially the knight on f2. Not to mention shaky king safety.} (27. Kb1 a5 { when taking on b5 will lead to a queen trap after Be8.} 28. Qxb5 $2 Be8) 27... Bf6) (25... b5 {is perfectly good too with the same ideas.}) 26. Qd2 {I expected Bf6 now to keep the tension on the kingside open for a while, but Magnus has no qualms about closing it right away.} e4 (26... Bf6 27. Be2 { is possible, and now Black can think whether to take on f4 or play like Magnus with e4. The computer gives a large advantage for Black after taking on f4, but it is definitely far from clear over the board.} exf4 28. gxf4 Rfe8 29. Rg1 (29. Bd4 Qe7) 29... Bf7 30. Kb1 a4 {Black has Nb3 ideas and even positional exchange sacrifices on e3.} 31. Bf3 Rxe3 32. Qxe3 Re8 33. Qa3 Bd4 {these are computer lines of course. I cannot imagine anyone finding any of these in a tournament game.}) 27. Be2 Be8 {Still even after not playing the best way on move 25 Magnus keeps hopes alive by maintaining a stable advantage. White has to solve the small issue of his vulnerable king.} 28. Kb1 Bf6 (28... Ba4 { is possible, White can sac the exchange with} 29. Bxh5 {now} b5 {is an out of this world move. Black is clearly better here by the way.}) 29. Re1 ({White's best defense is} 29. Nh3 $1 {posting the knight on g5. From there it always has the option to jump on e6 and create distraction.} Ba4 $5 30. b3 {looks scary for White, though he probably just survives the onslaught.} Bxb3 31. axb3 Nxb3 32. Qe1 b5 33. c5) 29... a4 {Magnus misses a great opportunity to try to seal the deal.} (29... Ba4 $1 {is incredibly powerful. Black's attack is simply much faster in all lines. Here are some ChessBase engine analysis:} 30. Rcc1 (30. b3 Bxb3 31. axb3 Nxb3 32. Qd1 a4 $1 {Is a steady but sure way to win as White cannot defend against all the threats. Qa5 is Black's main idea.} 33. Bxh5 (33. Ka2 Qa5 34. Qb1 b5) 33... Qa5 34. Bg6 Qb4 {Now a possible line is} 35. Qh5 (35. Ka2 Nc1+) 35... Rfd8 36. Bxf5 Nd4+ 37. Rb2 Qxe1+ 38. Ka2 Nxf5 39. Qxf5 Bxb2 {when White loses all his pieces.}) (30. Bxh5 Bxc2+ 31. Qxc2 b5 32. cxb5 Qd7 33. Qe2 Na4 $19) 30... b5 $1 {An important follow up.} 31. cxb5 (31. Bxh5 Qb7) (31. Bd4 Bxd4 32. Qxd4 bxc4 33. Rxc4 Rb8) 31... Qb6 32. Bd4 Bxd4 33. Qxd4 Bxb5 34. Bxh5 a4 {basically Black is almost winning after 29...Ba4. I think though it is unrealistic to expect a person to find it over the board. Just reading the reports on ChessBase I can only imagine how much tension the players are going through to perform well. Pressure, pressure pressure from every side.}) 30. Qb4 g6 31. Rd1 {When I first saw this move I thought it was an internet glitch. I expected Fabiano to improve the position of his knight with 31.Nd1.} (31. Nd1 {White will hopefully unravel and take a solid stance with Qd2 and Nc3.}) 31... Ra8 {Draw agreed. A big surprise, considering that Black still had a stable advantage in the position and on the clock. (If I remember correctly Magnus had 50 minutes left here compared to Fabiano's 20 minutes.) I guess Nh3 followed by Ng5 gives White a solid position, so Magnus decided to call it a day. Magnus must be really looking forward to the rapid tiebreaks, as he did two years ago against Sergey Karjakin. He missed great winning opportunities on move 25 and move 29 and I sort of suspect he came into the game with an eye on the tiebreaks. It's also posisble that he just wnated to make a lot of people happy (including myself). As two years ago we again get to see a four game rapid playoff! I am very excited to watch this match live. My prediction is that Fabiano will give Magnus a run for his money. That said, rapid games are a totally different kind of chess. Usually the player with the better nerves wins. Let's see what happens.} 1/2-1/2
[Event "WCh 2018"] [Site "London ENG"] [Date "2018.11.26"] [Round "12"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteTitle "GM"] [BlackTitle "GM"] [WhiteElo "2832"] [BlackElo "2835"] [ECO "B33"] [Opening "Sicilian"] [Variation "Pelikan (Lasker/Sveshnikov) variation"] [EventDate "2018.11.09"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Nd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Ne7 9. c4 Ng6 10. Qa4 Bd7 11. Qb4 Bf5 12. h4 h5 13. Qa4 Bd7 14. Qb4 Bf5 15. Be3 a6 16. Nc3 Qc7 17. g3 Be7 18. f3 Nf8 19. Ne4 Nd7 20. Bd3 O-O 21. Rh2 Rac8 22. O-O-O Bg6 23. Rc2 f5 24. Nf2 Nc5 25. f4 a5 26. Qd2 e4 27. Be2 Be8 28. Kb1 Bf6 29. Re1 a4 30. Qb4 g6 31. Rd1 Ra8 1/2-1/2
WCh London
Caruana, Fabiano - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 115 B31 Sicilian Rossolimo
Carlsen, Magnus - Caruana, Fabiano ½-½ 49 D37 QGD 5.Bf4
Caruana, Fabiano - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 49 B31 Sicilian Rossolimo
Carlsen, Magnus - Caruana, Fabiano ½-½ 34 A29 English Four Knights
Caruana, Fabiano - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 34 B31 Sicilian Rossolimo
Carlsen, Magnus - Caruana, Fabiano ½-½ 80 C42 Petroff's Defence
Carlsen, Magnus - Caruana, Fabiano ½-½ 40 D37 QGD 5.Bf4
Caruana, Fabiano - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 38 B33 Sicilian Sveshnikov
Carlsen, Magnus - Caruana, Fabiano ½-½ 56 A29 English Four Knights
Caruana, Fabiano - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 54 B33 Sicilian Sveshnikov
Carlsen, Magnus - Caruana, Fabiano ½-½ 55 C42 Petroff's Defence
Caruana, Fabiano - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 31 B33 Sicilian Sveshnikov
 
WCh London (ENG), 09-26 xi 2018
Name Ti NAT Rtng 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total Perf
Caruana, Fabiano g USA 2832 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 6 2835
Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2835 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 6 2832
  Judging by final-round entrances, Fabiano Caruana all business while Magnus Carlsen much more lighthearted, even with his title on the line.  

Legendary photographer Harry Benson is well known for taking some of the most captivating photos of Bobby Fischer. The 88-year-old arrived for game 12 to potentially photograph the next American World Champion.

The first symbolic move in the 12th game was made by Aldo del Bo, Head of Global Partnerships and Sponsorships of Kaspersky Lab, in presence of FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich

Giri & Svidler don't think Fabiano will "do a Magnus" and just try to go for a dry draw today: https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/carlsen-Carlsen Caruana
Svidler: "[Magnus] can't so easily surprise him with the French - he's a grown man, he has a repertoire against it" 🙂

FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich is present for the last classical game of Carlsen Caruana

Ready to fight

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Nd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Ne7 9. c4 Ng6 10. Qa4 Bd7 11. Qb4 Bf5 12. h4 h5 13. Qa4 Bd7 14. Qb4 Bf5 Caruana deviated on move 9. It is clear Carlsen has no problem repeating moves. Will Caruana accept?

Caruana's 12...h5, the first new human move of the game, was played by Stockfish against Houdini in the 11th TCEC Computer Chess Final earlier this year:

Game 12, Carlsen Caruana and Magnus Carlsen⁩ already slumped to one side of his chair. ⁦FabianoCaruana looks focused

After 12.h4 h5, this is bionic territory, this position having been disputed only by Houdini and Stockfish earlier this year. Thanks to Magnus Carlsen's choice of 8...Ne7, his information is likely to be fresher than Fabiano Caruana's. VIP room and press room are absolutely packed. I have no place to sit, unless I want to stay in the almost empty rooms that spectators use. Giri: I was thinking, though... if you do repeat moves here as White & you have to play the guy who saw you do it... 4 games - you lose face! He will think, 'I have a 4-game match with a chicken!' 🙂 Fabi didn't go for the draw! Svidler: "That shows great bottle"  

Caruana more than 30 minutes behind on the clock after 16 moves, and still thinking. It's still early, but the clock situation matters.

Zs Polgar 17. g3 and Carlsen immediately responded w/ 17...Be7. This is a very uncomfortable situation for Caruana. Objectively speaking his position is fine. But Carlsen is playing so fast. This can psychologically effect Caruana because he does not know if this is still in Carlsen’s prep  

Caruana spends 24 minutes to play 24.g3. Carlsen responds within 25 seconds and has a 40 minute time advantage now.

19...Nd7 20. Bd3. Now Carlsen can retreat his Bishop to g6 threatening f5 at some points. Exciting position but Caruana must pay attention to his clock, especially in the next 5-10 moves.

 

Commentators on chess24 excited about Caruana's surprising 21.Rh2: "The deepest move in the match!"ű

 

Caruana blinks with 21. Rh2 and now Lc0 -0.76, SF128 -0.46, black is better

Considering that Caruana has exhibited generally superior skills in all facets of the match (opening prep, middle game transition, endgames) it would seem a bit odd if he loses this match.
 

Carlsen goes 25...a5 and misses the chance to go b5 later. Sesse thought exf4 would give him a winning position, but he is still better on the board, and on the clock. #CarlsenCaruana

Garry Kasparov on Caruana's option of taking a three-fold repetition at move 13: "It would have basically meant moral capitulation. Not even considering that Magnus is favorite in rapid, blowing up your chances with White without even trying is morally devastating."

Difficult position and time situation for @FabianoCaruana... but with so much on riding on this game, will Magnus Carlsen convert?

A hölgy kommentátorok jól eltraccsolnak, nevetgélnek. Nem sok komoly szakmai mondandójuk akadt...

Kramnik: "It's a shame for Black to offer a draw in such position!"

Live, LIBA reaction on 31...Ra8. Draw offer. No commnet, by HUNONCHESS WorldChessCh2018G1.G12.pgn DOWNLOAD
[Event "World Chess Championship 2018"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.09"] [Round "1"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B31"] [WhiteElo "2832"] [BlackElo "2835"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "229"] [EventDate "2018.11.09"] [EventType "match"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. d3 Bg7 6. h3 Nf6 7. Nc3 Nd7 {B31: Sizilianisch (Rossolimo-Variante)} (7... O-O 8. O-O Ne8 9. Be3 b6 10. e5 f6 11. Re1 Nc7 12. Qd2 fxe5 13. Bh6 Rxf3 14. Bxg7 Kxg7 15. gxf3 Bxh3 16. Rxe5 e6 17. Rg5 {1-0 (33) Caruana,F (2827)-Gelfand,B (2703) Batumi 2018}) (7... b6 8. Be3 e5 9. O-O O-O 10. a3 Qe7 11. Qb1 Nh5 12. b4 f5 13. bxc5 f4 14. Bd2 bxc5 15. Qb3+ Be6 { 0-1 (39) Caruana,F (2820)-Carlsen,M (2862) Wijk aan Zee 2015 CBM 165 [Stohl,I]} ) 8. Be3 e5 9. O-O b6 {LiveBook: 6 Partien} 10. Nh2 Nf8 11. f4 $146 ({ Vorgänger:} 11. Qd2 Ne6 12. Bh6 O-O 13. Bxg7 Kxg7 14. Ne2 Qg5 15. f4 exf4 16. Nxf4 {1-0 (45) Manik,M (2440)-Nayhebaver,M (2005) Kosice 2010}) 11... exf4 12. Rxf4 Be6 13. Rf2 h6 14. Qd2 g5 15. Raf1 Qd6 16. Ng4 O-O-O $1 17. Nf6 Nd7 18. Nh5 Be5 19. g4 f6 20. b3 Bf7 21. Nd1 Nf8 22. Nxf6 Ne6 23. Nh5 (23. Nd7 $5 { [%cal Rd7e5]} Bf4 24. Nf6 $11) 23... Bxh5 (23... Bg6 {is interesting.} 24. Kh1 Qe7 25. Qe2 Rdg8 26. Rg1 Kb8) 24. gxh5 Nf4 25. Bxf4 gxf4 26. Rg2 Rhg8 27. Qe2 Rxg2+ 28. Qxg2 Qe6 $1 29. Nf2 $1 Rg8 $36 {[%mdl 2048] Schwarz hat starke Initiative.} 30. Ng4 Qe8 31. Qf3 Qxh5 32. Kf2 $1 Bc7 33. Ke2 {[#]} (33. e5 $1 $15 Kb7 34. Nf6 Qh4+ 35. Ke2) 33... Qg5 $1 $19 34. Nh2 (34. Qf2 {war nötig.}) 34... h5 35. Rf2 Qg1 36. Nf1 h4 (36... Qg7 $19 37. Nd2 Kb7) 37. Kd2 $2 (37. e5 $1 $15) 37... Kb7 38. c3 Be5 {Droht ...Tg3! und aus.} 39. Kc2 Qg7 (39... b5 $19 {zielt auf ...Tg3! ab.} 40. Qe2 b4 41. cxb4 Bd4) 40. Nh2 $1 $15 Bxc3 41. Qxf4 Bd4 42. Qf7+ Ka6 $1 43. Qxg7 Rxg7 {[%mdl 4096] Endspiel KTL-KTS} ({Doch nicht} 43... Bxg7 $6 44. Rf5 $11) 44. Re2 Rg3 45. Ng4 {e5 ist eine echte Drohung.} Rxh3 {Weiss muss nun ...Tg3 beachten.} 46. e5 Rf3 47. e6 Rf8 48. e7 Re8 49. Nh6 $1 h3 50. Nf5 {[#] Und weiter mit Th2 wäre nett.} Bf6 $1 51. a3 b5 ({Günstiger ist} 51... Ka5 $17) 52. b4 $11 cxb4 53. axb4 {[#]} Bxe7 $1 {[%mdl 512]} 54. Nxe7 (54. Rxe7 Rxe7) 54... h2 55. Rxh2 {Und Th7 würde nun gewinnen.} Rxe7 { KT-KT} 56. Rh6 Kb6 57. Kc3 Rd7 58. Rg6 Kc7 59. Rh6 Rd6 60. Rh8 $1 Rg6 61. Ra8 $1 Kb7 62. Rh8 Rg5 63. Rh7+ Kb6 64. Rh6 Rg1 {Weiss sollte ...a5 verhindern.} 65. Kc2 Rf1 66. Rg6 Rh1 67. Rf6 Rh8 68. Kc3 Ra8 {Mit der Idee ...a5.} 69. d4 Rd8 70. Rh6 Rd7 71. Rg6 Kc7 72. Rg5 Rd6 73. Rg8 Rh6 74. Ra8 Rh3+ 75. Kc2 Ra3 76. Kb2 Ra4 77. Kc3 $1 a6 78. Rh8 Ra3+ 79. Kb2 Rg3 (79... Rd3 {feels hotter.} 80. Rh7+ Kd6 81. Ra7 Rxd4 82. Ka3 Rd3+) 80. Kc2 Rg5 81. Rh6 Rd5 82. Kc3 Rd6 83. Rh8 $1 Rg6 84. Kc2 Kb7 85. Kc3 Rg3+ 86. Kc2 Rg1 87. Rh5 Rg2+ 88. Kc3 $1 Rg3+ 89. Kc2 Rg4 90. Kc3 Kb6 91. Rh6 Rg5 92. Rf6 Rh5 93. Rg6 Rh3+ 94. Kc2 Rh5 95. Kc3 $1 Rd5 96. Rh6 Kc7 97. Rh7+ Rd7 98. Rh5 Rd6 99. Rh8 $1 Rg6 100. Rf8 Rg3+ 101. Kc2 Ra3 102. Rf7+ Kd6 103. Ra7 $1 Kd5 {Droht stark ...Kc4.} 104. Kb2 Rd3 105. Rxa6 Rxd4 106. Kb3 Re4 107. Kc3 Rc4+ 108. Kb3 Kd4 109. Rb6 $1 {Die Stellung ist ausgeglichen.} Kd3 110. Ra6 Rc2 111. Rb6 $1 Rc3+ 112. Kb2 Rc4 113. Kb3 Kd4 114. Ra6 Kd5 115. Ra8 {Precision: Weiß = 71%, Schwarz = 67%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "World Chess Championship 2018"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.10"] [Round "2"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D37"] [WhiteElo "2835"] [BlackElo "2832"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "97"] [EventDate "2018.10.20"] [EventType "match"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] {[%evp 19,97,29,29,13,15,18,14,10,20,0,33,0,0,0,0,-9,-12,-15,-9,-9,-9,-14,0, -40,-39,-49,6,-14,-14,-14,-14,-14,-14,-14,-17,-17,-25,-33,-33,-33,-33,-33,-33, -33,-33,-38,-38,-80,-80,-94,-25,-27,-27,-35,-34,-88,-88,-88,-88,-122,-122,-122, -122,-122,-32,-32,-32,-32,-32,-32,-32,-32,-32,-32,-32,-32,0,-8,0,-32]} 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 e6 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 c5 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. Qc2 Nc6 9. a3 Qa5 10. Rd1 Rd8 {LiveBook: 10 Games. D37: Queen's Gambit Declined: 5 Bf4} (10... Re8 11. Nd2 e5 12. Bg5 Nd4 13. Qc1 Bf5 14. Bxf6 Nc2+ 15. Ke2 Nd4+ 16. Ke1 Nc2+ 17. Ke2 Nd4+ 18. Ke1 {1/2-1/2 (18) So,W (2778)-Nakamura,H (2769) Paris 2018}) 11. Be2 Ne4 $146 ({Predecessor:} 11... a6 12. O-O dxc4 13. Bxc4 Rxd1 14. Rxd1 b5 15. Bd3 Be7 16. Ne4 Bb7 17. Nxf6+ Bxf6 18. Bxh7+ Kh8 19. Rd7 Nd8 20. Bc7 Qa4 {1/2-1/2 (20) Mason,D (2167)-Tambini,J (2047) Aberystwyth 2014} ) 12. O-O Nxc3 13. bxc3 h6 14. a4 Ne7 15. Ne5 Bd6 16. cxd5 Nxd5 17. Bf3 Nxf4 18. exf4 Bxe5 19. Rxd8+ Qxd8 20. fxe5 Qc7 21. Rb1 Rb8 22. Qd3 Bd7 (22... b6 $15 ) 23. a5 Bc6 {White should prevent ...Bxf3.} 24. Qd6 Qxd6 25. exd6 Bxf3 26. gxf3 $11 {[%mdl 4096] Endgame KR-KR} Kf8 27. c4 {c5 is the strong threat.} Ke8 28. a6 b6 29. c5 $1 Kd7 {Hoping for ...Kc6.} 30. cxb6 axb6 31. a7 $1 {[%cal Ra7b8]} Ra8 {Threatens to win with ...Kc6.} 32. Rxb6 {Black must now prevent Rb7+.} Rxa7 33. Kg2 e5 34. Rb4 f5 ({Black should play} 34... Kxd6 $17 35. f4 exf4 36. Rxf4 Ke6) 35. Rb6 Ke6 36. d7+ Kxd7 37. Rb5 ({Better is} 37. f4 $1 $15) 37... Ke6 $17 38. Rb6+ {[#]} Kf7 $1 39. Rb5 Kf6 40. Rb6+ Kg5 41. Rb5 {[#]} Kf4 (41... Re7 $1 $17 42. Kg3 f4+ 43. Kh3 Re8) 42. Rb4+ $15 e4 43. fxe4 fxe4 44. h3 Ra5 45. Rb7 Rg5+ 46. Kf1 Rg6 47. Rb4 Rg5 48. Rb7 Rg6 49. Rb4 {Precision: White = 62%, Black = 70%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "World Chess Championship 2018"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.12"] [Round "3"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B31"] [WhiteElo "2832"] [BlackElo "2835"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "97"] [EventDate "2018.10.20"] [EventType "match"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] {[%evp 13,97,20,12,14,10,21,27,13,37,25,30,23,34,29,34,37,32,27,27,26,35,30,33, 25,15,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,-4,0,0,0,-8,-8,-14,-12,-14,-8,-8,-8,-32,-8, -12,-8,-22,-8,-19,-8,-24,-22,-34,-8,-8,0,-8,-8,-8,-8,-8,-8,-8,-8,-8,-8,-8,-8, -8,-8,-8,-8,-8,-8,-8,-8,-8]} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. d3 Bg7 6. O-O Qc7 7. Re1 e5 {LiveBook: 14 Games} 8. a3 {B31: Sicilian: 2...Nc6 3 Bb5 g6} (8. Be3 b6 9. a3 Nf6 10. h3 O-O 11. Nbd2 a5 12. b4 cxb4 13. axb4 a4 14. Nc4 Nd7 15. Qd2 Ba6 16. Na3 Rfe8 17. c4 b5 18. Rac1 Qb7 19. c5 Rad8 20. Bh6 Bh8 21. Bg5 {1/2-1/2 (21) Balogh,C (2632)-Azarov,S (2552) Czech Republic 2017}) 8... Nf6 9. b4 O-O 10. Nbd2 {White has an edge.} Bg4 $146 ({Predecessor:} 10... cxb4 11. Bb2 Nh5 12. axb4 Nf4 13. Ra3 Re8 14. Qa1 a6 15. d4 exd4 16. Bxd4 Bxd4 17. Nxd4 Qe7 18. Rf3 Nxg2 19. e5 Nxe1 {0-1 (19) Kaiszauri,K (2405)-Cramling,D (2355) Boras 1979}) 11. h3 Bxf3 12. Nxf3 cxb4 13. axb4 a5 14. bxa5 Rxa5 15. Bd2 Raa8 16. Qb1 Nd7 17. Qb4 Rfe8 18. Bc3 b5 19. Rxa8 Rxa8 20. Ra1 Rxa1+ 21. Bxa1 Qa7 22. Bc3 Qa2 23. Qb2 Qxb2 24. Bxb2 $11 {[%mdl 4096] Endgame KBN-KBN} f6 25. Kf1 Kf7 26. Ke2 Nc5 27. Bc3 Ne6 28. g3 Bf8 29. Nd2 Ng5 30. h4 Ne6 31. Nb3 h5 32. Bd2 Bd6 33. c3 c5 34. Be3 Ke7 35. Kd1 Kd7 36. Kc2 f5 37. Kd1 fxe4 38. dxe4 {The position is equal.} c4 39. Nd2 Nc5 40. Bxc5 Bxc5 {KB-KN} 41. Ke2 Kc6 42. Nf1 b4 43. cxb4 Bxb4 44. Ne3 Kc5 45. f4 exf4 46. gxf4 Ba5 47. f5 gxf5 {[#]} 48. Nxc4 $1 {[%mdl 512]} Kxc4 49. exf5 {Precision: White = 62%, Black = 72%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "World Chess Championship 2018"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.13"] [Round "4"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A29"] [WhiteElo "2835"] [BlackElo "2832"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "67"] [EventDate "2018.10.20"] [EventType "match"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] {[%evp 14,67,14,2,8,17,22,16,15,13,14,6,5,5,24,21,41,0,0,-1,0,0,18,14,14,14,15, 19,27,7,28,10,10,1,14,0,7,2,8,0,15,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,-7,0,0]} 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Bc5 {A29: English Opening: Four Knights Variation with 4 g3} 7. O-O O-O 8. d3 {LiveBook: 13 Games} Re8 9. Bd2 Nxc3 10. Bxc3 Nd4 11. b4 $146 ({Predecessor:} 11. Rc1 Bb6 12. Re1 Bg4 13. Bxd4 exd4 14. a3 {1/2-1/2 (67) So,W (2778)-Caruana,F (2816) Paris 2018}) 11... Bd6 12. Rb1 Nxf3+ 13. Bxf3 a6 14. a4 c6 15. Re1 Bd7 16. e3 Qf6 17. Be4 Bf5 18. Qf3 Bxe4 19. Qxf6 gxf6 20. dxe4 b5 21. Red1 Bf8 22. axb5 axb5 {The position is equal.} 23. Kg2 Red8 24. Rdc1 Kg7 25. Be1 Rdc8 26. Rc2 Ra4 27. Kf3 h5 28. Ke2 Kg6 29. h3 f5 30. exf5+ Kxf5 31. f3 Be7 32. e4+ Ke6 33. Bd2 Bd6 34. Rbc1 { Precision: White = 51%, Black = 51%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "World Chess Championship 2018"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.15"] [Round "5"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B31"] [WhiteElo "2832"] [BlackElo "2835"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "67"] [EventDate "2018.10.20"] [EventType "match"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] {[%evp 18,67,21,21,21,23,24,13,16,18,16,16,18,5,10,23,23,-8,-17,-10,-22,-5,-13, -19,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0]} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. O-O Bg7 5. Re1 e5 6. b4 Nxb4 7. Bb2 {B31: Sicilian: 2...Nc6 3 Bb5 g6} a6 (7... Qc7 8. c3 Nc6 9. d4 d6 10. d5 a6 11. Na3 Ke7 12. Bf1 Nd8 13. Nc4 b5 14. Ne3 Nf6 {0-1 (44) Rapport,R (2676)-Granda Zuniga,J (2665) Camarinas 2013}) 8. a3 axb5 9. axb4 Rxa1 10. Bxa1 {LiveBook: 3 Games} d6 11. bxc5 Ne7 12. Qe2 $146 ({Predecessor:} 12. cxd6 Qxd6 13. d4 exd4 14. Bxd4 O-O {0-1 (46) Polschikov,A (2270)-Anoshkin,A (2386) Pardubice 2007}) 12... b4 $1 13. Qc4 Qa5 {[#] Strongly threatening ...Be6.} 14. cxd6 Be6 15. Qc7 Qxc7 16. dxc7 Nc6 17. c3 {aiming for d4.} Kd7 {And now ...Ra8 would win.The position is equal.} 18. cxb4 Ra8 19. Bc3 Kxc7 20. d3 Kb6 21. Bd2 Rd8 22. Be3+ Kb5 23. Nc3+ Kxb4 24. Nd5+ $1 Bxd5 25. exd5 Rxd5 26. Rb1+ Kc3 27. Rxb7 {Black must now prevent Rc7.} Nd8 $1 {[%cal Rd8b7]} 28. Rc7+ Kxd3 29. Kf1 h5 30. h3 Ke4 31. Ng5+ Kf5 32. Nxf7 Nxf7 33. Rxf7+ Bf6 34. g4+ {Precision: White = 70%, Black = 92%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "World Chess Championship 2018"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.16"] [Round "6"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C42"] [WhiteElo "2835"] [BlackElo "2832"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "160"] [EventDate "2018.10.20"] [EventType "match"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] {[%evp 9,160,29,26,16,4,8,10,6,16,14,14,14,16,18,0,6,17,17,16,14,12,11,17,17, 14,15,14,15,22,17,14,16,15,16,9,-12,-5,-12,-6,-13,-18,-9,-2,-2,-1,-1,-9,-7,-4, -9,-4,-7,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,-9,-8,-22,-23,-26,-26,-27,-23,-38,-41,-43,-40,-42,-25, -30,-30,-30,-36,-37,-38,-73,-72,-66,-73,-74,-70,-69,-62,-97,-93,-100,-95,-93, -93,-92,-92,-93,-92,-92,-79,-127,-102,-135,-124,-110,-110,-151,-151,-151,-151, -151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151, -151,-366,-366,-352,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,0,-151,-151,-151, -151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-151,-8,-8,-8]} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nd3 {[%cal Be5d3,Bd3f4,Bf4d5][%mdl 32]} (4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. d4 d5 6. Bd3 Bd6 7. O-O O-O 8. c4 c6 9. Nc3 Nxc3 10. bxc3 dxc4 11. Bxc4 Bf5 12. Ng5 h6 13. Qf3 Bg6 14. Ne4 Bxh2+ 15. Kxh2 Qh4+ 16. Qh3 Qxh3+ 17. gxh3 Bxe4 18. Rg1 Re8 19. Bxh6 g6 {1/2-1/2 (52) Vachier Lagrave,M (2780)-Wang,H (2722) Douglas 2018}) (4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Nc3 Nxc3 6. dxc3 Be7 7. Be3 Nc6 8. Bc4 O-O 9. Qd2 Bf5 10. O-O-O Qd7 11. Kb1 Rfe8 12. h4 Bf8 13. h5 h6 14. Be2 Bg4 15. Nh2 Bxe2 16. Qxe2 {1/2-1/2 (41) Carlsen,M (2842)-Caruana,F (2822) Saint Louis 2018}) 4... Nxe4 5. Qe2 Qe7 {LiveBook: 14 Games} 6. Nf4 {And now Nd5 would win. C42: Petroff Defence: 3 Nxe5 and unusual White 3rd moves} Nc6 {[%cal Bb8c6,Bc6d4, Bd4e2][%mdl 32]} 7. Nd5 Nd4 {[%mdl 64] ...Qe5 is the strong threat. Double Attack} 8. Nxe7 Nxe2 9. Nd5 Nd4 $1 {[%cal Rd4c2]} 10. Na3 $146 ({Predecessor:} 10. Bd3 Nxf2 11. Kxf2 Kd8 12. Re1 c5 13. c3 c4 14. cxd4 cxd3 {0-1 (47) Baudifier,Y (1600)-Sochacki,C (1009) France 2002}) 10... Ne6 11. f3 N4c5 12. d4 Nd7 13. c3 c6 14. Nf4 Nb6 15. Bd3 d5 16. Nc2 Bd6 17. Nxe6 Bxe6 18. Kf2 h5 19. h4 Nc8 20. Ne3 Ne7 21. g3 c5 22. Bc2 O-O 23. Rd1 Rfd8 24. Ng2 cxd4 25. cxd4 Rac8 26. Bb3 Nc6 {[%cal Be7c6,Bc6a5,Ba5c4,Bc4a3][%mdl 32]} 27. Bf4 Na5 28. Rdc1 Bb4 29. Bd1 Nc4 30. b3 Na3 31. Rxc8 Rxc8 32. Rc1 Nb5 33. Rxc8+ Bxc8 34. Ne3 Nc3 35. Bc2 Ba3 36. Bb8 a6 37. f4 Bd7 38. f5 Bc6 39. Bd1 Bb2 40. Bxh5 Ne4+ { [%mdl 64] Discovered Attack} 41. Kg2 Bxd4 42. Bf4 Bc5 43. Bf3 Nd2 44. Bxd5 Bxe3 $1 45. Bxc6 Bxf4 46. Bxb7 Bd6 $1 47. Bxa6 Ne4 48. g4 Ba3 $1 49. Bc4 Kf8 50. g5 Nc3 $1 51. b4 Bxb4 52. Kf3 Na4 53. Bb5 Nc5 54. a4 f6 55. Kg4 Ne4 56. Kh5 Be1 $1 57. Bd3 Nd6 $1 58. a5 Bxa5 {Strongly threatening ...Nf7.} 59. gxf6 gxf6 { Threatens to win with ...Nf7.} 60. Kg6 Bd8 61. Kh7 Nf7 62. Bc4 Ne5 63. Bd5 Ba5 64. h5 Bd2 65. Ba2 Nf3 66. Bd5 Nd4 67. Kg6 $2 {[#]} (67. Bc4 $17) 67... Bg5 $1 $19 68. Bc4 {[#]} Nf3 (68... Bh4 $1 $19 {has better winning chances.} 69. Bd5 Ne2) 69. Kh7 $17 Ne5 70. Bb3 Ng4 71. Bc4 Ne3 72. Bd3 Ng4 73. Bc4 $1 Nh6 74. Kg6 Ke7 75. Bb3 Kd6 76. Bc2 Ke5 77. Bd3 Kf4 78. Bc2 Ng4 79. Bb3 Ne3 ({Better is} 79... Kg3 $17 {Hoping for ...Nh6.} 80. Bf7 Kf2) 80. h6 $11 {[#]} Bxh6 $1 { [%mdl 512] Accuracy: White = 68%, Black = 83%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "World Chess Championship 2018"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.18"] [Round "7"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D37"] [WhiteElo "2835"] [BlackElo "2832"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "79"] [EventDate "2018.10.20"] [EventType "match"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] {[%evp 17,79,18,18,18,27,20,36,0,24,6,10,0,6,0,6,10,11,1,9,0,5,5,12,12,12,7,5, 8,6,7,6,4,6,6,12,0,4,4,16,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0]} 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 e6 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 c5 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. Qc2 Nc6 9. a3 Qa5 10. Nd2 {[#] Strongly threatening cxd5. D37: Queen's Gambit Declined: 5 Bf4} (10. O-O-O Be7 11. Kb1 a6 12. g4 dxc4 13. Bxc4 b5 14. g5 bxc4 15. gxf6 Bxf6 16. Ne4 Be7 17. Rhg1 Rd8 18. Rxd8+ Nxd8 19. Qxc4 {1/2-1/2 (27) Karjakin,S (2773)-Nakamura,H (2777) Saint Louis 2018}) 10... Qd8 11. Nb3 { Threatens to win with cxd5.} Bb6 $146 ({Predecessor:} 11... Be7 12. Rd1 a5 13. cxd5 exd5 14. Be2 a4 15. Nd4 Qa5 16. O-O Bd7 17. Ndb5 Rfc8 {1-0 (36) Golod,V (2584)-Gershkowich,D (2341) Haifa 2008}) 12. Be2 {White is slightly better.} Qe7 13. Bg5 dxc4 {The position is equal.} 14. Nd2 Ne5 15. O-O Bd7 16. Bf4 Ng6 17. Bg3 Bc6 18. Nxc4 {Black must now prevent Bd6.} Bc7 19. Rfd1 Rfd8 20. Rxd8+ Rxd8 21. Rd1 Rxd1+ 22. Qxd1 Nd5 23. Qd4 Nxc3 24. Qxc3 Bxg3 25. hxg3 Qd7 26. Bd3 b6 27. f3 Bb7 28. Bxg6 hxg6 29. e4 Qc7 30. e5 Qc5+ 31. Kh2 Ba6 32. Nd6 Qxc3 33. bxc3 $11 {[%mdl 4096] Endgame KB-KN} f6 34. f4 Kf8 35. Kg1 Ke7 36. Kf2 Kd7 37. Ke3 Bf1 38. Kf2 Ba6 39. Ke3 Bf1 40. Kf2 {Accuracy: White = 73%, Black = 77%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "World Chess Championship 2018"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.19"] [Round "8"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B33"] [WhiteElo "2832"] [BlackElo "2835"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "75"] [EventDate "2018.10.20"] [EventType "match"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] {[%evp 19,75,0,0,0,2,0,18,23,18,18,12,9,13,12,19,20,28,0,44,35,65,50,70,80,125, 95,97,86,73,22,13,23,20,18,18,18,18,18,17,17,12,24,25,25,25,25,43,45,61,8,12,0, 0,0,18,0,-2,-2]} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Nd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Nb8 9. a4 {[%cal Ba2a4,Ba4a5][%mdl 32]} Be7 10. Be2 O-O 11. O-O {B33: Sicilian: Pelikan and Sveshnikov Variations} Nd7 12. Bd2 f5 ( 12... a6 13. Na3 a5 14. Nc4 b6 15. f4 Ba6 16. Ne3 Bb7 17. Bc3 g6 18. Bb5 Ba6 19. Bxd7 Qxd7 {1-0 (53) Oparin,G (2602)-Gelfand,B (2697) Moscow 2017}) 13. a5 a6 14. Na3 {[%cal Bb5a3,Ba3c4,Bc4b6][%mdl 32]} e4 $146 ({Predecessor:} 14... Nf6 15. Bb4 Bd7 16. Nc4 Bb5 17. Nb6 Bxe2 18. Qxe2 {1-0 (71) Voll,A (2572) -Saidashev,A (2401) ICCF email 2015}) 15. Nc4 Ne5 16. Nb6 $36 {[%mdl 2048] White fights for an advantage.} Rb8 17. f4 exf3 18. Bxf3 g5 19. c4 f4 20. Bc3 Bf5 21. c5 Nxf3+ 22. Qxf3 dxc5 23. Rad1 Bd6 {Black wants to play ...g4.} 24. h3 (24. Nc4 $16) 24... Qe8 $11 25. Nc4 Qg6 $1 26. Nxd6 Qxd6 {[#]} 27. h4 $1 { [%mdl 512]} gxh4 28. Qxf4 Qxf4 29. Rxf4 h5 30. Re1 {Strongly threatening Re7.} Bg4 31. Rf6 Rxf6 32. Bxf6 {[%mdl 4096] Endgame KRB-KRB} Kf7 33. Bxh4 Re8 34. Rf1+ ({White should play} 34. Rxe8 $14 Kxe8 35. Kf2) 34... Kg8 {The position is equal.} 35. Rf6 Re2 36. Rg6+ Kf8 37. d6 {Rxg4! is the strong threat.} Rd2 ({ Avoid the trap} 37... Rxb2 $2 {[#]} 38. Rxg4 $1 {[%mdl 512]} Rd2 39. Rc4 $18) 38. Rg5 {Accuracy: White = 71%, Black = 77%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "World Chess Championship 2018"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.21"] [Round "9"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A29"] [WhiteElo "2835"] [BlackElo "2832"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "112"] [EventDate "2018.10.20"] [EventType "match"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] {[%evp 10,112,0,0,29,31,12,-10,4,-4,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,-13,6,-17,5,13,15,11,17,0,58, 49,48,47,47,47,48,54,54,45,55,47,60,67,62,29,31,14,20,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,8, 8,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,0,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,31,31,59,12,59,59,59,59,59,59,59,59, 59,12,59,12,45,59,59,12,66,22,24,24,24,28,67]} 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Bc5 {A29: English Opening: Four Knights Variation with 4 g3} 7. O-O O-O 8. d3 Re8 {The position is equal.} (8... Bb6 9. Nxd5 Qxd5 10. Bd2 Qd6 11. Bc3 Re8 12. Nd2 Qh6 13. b4 Bh3 14. b5 Bxg2 15. Kxg2 {1/2-1/2 (56) Ding,L (2804)-Navara,D (2740) Batumi 2018}) 9. Bg5 Nxc3 10. bxc3 f6 11. Bc1 $146 ({Predecessor:} 11. Be3 Bxe3 12. fxe3 Be6 13. Qa4 Qe7 14. Nh4 Qc5 { 0-1 (46) Curic,D (2195)-Majeric,Z (2312) Sibenik 2008}) 11... Be6 12. Bb2 Bb6 13. d4 Bd5 14. Qc2 exd4 15. cxd4 Be4 16. Qb3+ Bd5 17. Qd1 Bxf3 (17... Qd7 $11) 18. Qb3+ Kh8 19. Bxf3 Nxd4 20. Bxd4 Qxd4 21. e3 Qe5 22. Bxb7 Rad8 23. Rad1 Qe7 24. h4 g6 25. h5 gxh5 26. Qc4 f5 27. Bf3 h4 28. Rxd8 Rxd8 29. gxh4 Rg8+ 30. Kh1 Qf6 31. Qf4 Bc5 32. Rg1 Rxg1+ 33. Kxg1 Bd6 34. Qa4 f4 35. Qxa7 fxe3 36. Qxe3 Qxh4 37. a4 Qf6 38. Bd1 (38. Qb3 {seems wilder.} Kg7 39. Kf1 Qa1+ 40. Kg2 Qe5 41. Qd3) 38... Qe5 39. Qxe5+ Bxe5 $11 {[%mdl 4096] Endgame KB-KB} 40. a5 Kg7 41. a6 {[#] a7 is the strong threat.} Bd4 42. Kg2 Kf6 43. f4 Bb6 44. Kf3 h6 45. Ke4 Ba7 46. Bg4 $1 Bg1 47. Kd5 Bb6 48. Kc6 Be3 49. Kb7 Bb6 50. Bh3 Be3 51. Kc6 (51. f5 $5 {[%cal Rb7c7]} Bb6 52. Bg4 $14) 51... Bb6 52. Kd5 Ba7 53. Ke4 Bb6 ( 53... c5 $11) 54. Bf1 Ke6 55. Bc4+ Kf6 $1 56. Bd3 Ke6 {Accuracy: White = 52%, Black = 65%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "World Chess Championship 2018"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.22"] [Round "10"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B33"] [WhiteElo "2832"] [BlackElo "2835"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "107"] [EventDate "2018.10.20"] [EventType "match"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] {[%evp 21,107,1,23,9,0,-8,3,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,-26,-9,-41,-8,-20,0,0,0,0,94, -3,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 0,0,48,54,108,108,108,108,116,116,116,116,116,116,116,108,108,108,108,108,108, 108]} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Nd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Nb8 9. a4 Be7 10. Be2 O-O 11. O-O {B33: Sicilian: Pelikan and Sveshnikov Variations} Nd7 {LiveBook: 51 Games} 12. b4 $146 ({Predecessor:} 12. Bd2 a6 13. Na3 a5 14. Nc4 b6 15. f4 Ba6 16. Ne3 Bb7 17. Bc3 g6 18. Bb5 Ba6 19. Bxd7 Qxd7 {1-0 (53) Oparin,G (2602)-Gelfand,B (2697) Moscow 2017}) 12... a6 13. Na3 {The position is equal.} a5 14. bxa5 Rxa5 15. Nc4 Ra8 16. Be3 f5 17. a5 f4 18. Bb6 $36 {[%mdl 2048] White fights for an advantage.} Qe8 19. Ra3 Qg6 20. Bc7 e4 21. Kh1 $1 b5 {[%cal Bb7b5,Bb5b4][%mdl 32]} 22. Nb6 $1 {[%cal Rb6a8]} Nxb6 23. Bxb6 Qg5 (23... b4 $11 {remains equal.} 24. Ra4 Bf6) 24. g3 (24. Bxb5 $16 Rf6 25. Bc6) 24... b4 25. Rb3 Bh3 26. Rg1 $1 {[#] And now gxf4 would win.} f3 27. Bf1 Bxf1 28. Qxf1 Qxd5 29. Rxb4 Qe6 30. Rb5 Bd8 {aiming for ...Bxb6.} 31. Qe1 Bxb6 32. axb6 Rab8 33. Qe3 Qc4 34. Rb2 Rb7 35. Rd1 Qe2 36. Re1 Qxe3 37. Rxe3 $11 {[%mdl 4096] Endgame KRR-KRR} d5 38. h4 Rc8 39. Ra3 Kf7 40. Kh2 Ke6 41. g4 Rc6 42. Ra6 Ke5 43. Kg3 h6 44. h5 Kd4 45. Rb5 Rd6 (45... e3 $14) 46. Ra4+ $16 {White is better.} Ke5 {[#]} 47. Rab4 $1 Ke6 48. c4 dxc4 49. Rxc4 Rdxb6 50. Rxe4+ Kf7 51. Rf5+ Rf6 52. Rxf6+ Kxf6 53. Kxf3 Kf7 54. Kg3 {Accuracy: White = 78%, Black = 66%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "World Chess Championship 2018"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.24"] [Round "11"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C42"] [WhiteElo "2835"] [BlackElo "2832"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "110"] [EventDate "2018.10.20"] [EventType "match"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] {[%evp 21,110,20,39,33,37,32,31,26,26,13,13,12,20,18,18,22,20,20,20,22,20,5,5, 6,16,12,11,10,13,1,46,50,52,27,58,58,60,59,59,59,62,56,56,56,56,56,56,56,56,51, 51,51,54,54,56,56,56,56,56,36,37,37,36,36,36,36,36,36,36,36,35,31,31,31,31,31, 31,31,26,26,26,26,31,26,26,0,31,31,31,26,31]} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Nc3 Nxc3 6. dxc3 Be7 7. Be3 O-O 8. Qd2 {C42: Petroff Defence: 3 Nxe5 and unusual White 3rd moves} Nd7 9. O-O-O Nf6 10. Bd3 c5 11. Rhe1 Be6 { LiveBook: 3 Games} 12. Kb1 $146 ({Predecessor:} 12. Bg5 Qa5 13. a3 Rfe8 14. Bxf6 Bxf6 15. Ng5 Bxg5 16. Qxg5 {1/2-1/2 (46) Giri,A (2772)-Motylev,A (2675) Tbilisi 2017}) 12... Qa5 13. c4 Qxd2 14. Bxd2 {Threatening Ng5.} h6 15. Nh4 Rfe8 16. Ng6 Ng4 17. Nxe7+ Rxe7 18. Re2 Ne5 19. Bf4 Nxd3 20. Rxd3 Rd7 21. Rxd6 Rxd6 22. Bxd6 $11 {[%mdl 4096] Endgame KRB-KRB} Rd8 23. Rd2 Bxc4 24. Kc1 b6 25. Bf4 Rxd2 (25... Re8 {looks sharper.} 26. Rd7 Re1+ 27. Kd2 Re2+ 28. Kc3 Bxa2 29. b3 Rxf2 30. Bg3 Rxg2 31. Kb2 f5) 26. Kxd2 {KB-KB} a6 27. a3 Kf8 28. Bc7 b5 29. Bd6+ Ke8 30. Bxc5 h5 31. Ke3 Kd7 32. Kd4 g6 33. g3 Be2 34. Bf8 Kc6 35. b3 Bd1 36. Kd3 Bg4 37. c4 Be6 38. Kd4 bxc4 39. bxc4 Bg4 40. c5 Be6 41. Bh6 Bd5 42. Be3 Be6 43. Ke5 Bd5 44. Kf4 Be6 45. Kg5 Bd5 46. g4 hxg4 47. Kxg4 Ba2 48. Kg5 Bb3 49. Kf6 Ba2 50. h4 Bb3 51. f4 {[%cal Bf2f4,Bf4f5][%mdl 32]} Ba2 52. Ke7 Bb3 53. Kf6 Ba2 54. f5 Bb1 55. Bf2 Bc2 {Accuracy: White = 55%, Black = 82%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "World Chess Championship 2018"] [Site "London"] [Date "2018.11.26"] [Round "12"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B33"] [WhiteElo "2832"] [BlackElo "2835"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "62"] [EventDate "2018.10.20"] [EventType "match"] [EventCountry "ENG"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Nd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Ne7 9. c4 Ng6 10. Qa4 Bd7 11. Qb4 Bf5 {B33: Sicilian: Pelikan and Sveshnikov Variations} 12. h4 {LiveBook: 3 Games} h5 $146 ({Predecessor:} 12... a6 13. h5 Nf4 14. Nc3 Be7 15. Be3 Nd3+ 16. Bxd3 Bxd3 17. h6 O-O 18. Rd1 a5 19. Qb5 { 1-0 (45) Kramnik,V (2779)-Roganovic,M (2527) Batumi 2018}) 13. Qa4 Bd7 $1 { [#] aiming for ...a6.The position is equal.} 14. Qb4 Bf5 15. Be3 a6 16. Nc3 Qc7 17. g3 Be7 18. f3 Nf8 {[%cal Bg6f8,Bf8d7,Bd7c5][%mdl 32]} 19. Ne4 Nd7 20. Bd3 O-O 21. Rh2 Rac8 22. O-O-O Bg6 23. Rc2 f5 24. Nf2 Nc5 25. f4 a5 26. Qd2 e4 { Black is slightly better.} 27. Be2 Be8 28. Kb1 Bf6 29. Re1 a4 30. Qb4 g6 31. Rd1 Ra8 {Accuracy: White = 46%, Black = 70%.} 1/2-1/2
A statisztikák szerint is egyértelmü a fölény a norvég javára a gyors partikban, bár ez most DUPLÁN az idegek harca is lesz. Magnus Carlsen Világbajnok Klasszikus SAKK:Háromszoros világbajnok, a Fischer sakkal 4 Ráadásnak vilégbajnok volt még rapid: 2014, 2015 villám: 2009, 2014
# Name Classic +/− Rapid   Blitz Age
1 Carlsen 2835.0 0.0 2880.0 2939.0 27
2 Caruana 2832.0 0.0 2789.0 2767.0 26
2018: 1,5-0,5 vs Anish Giri 2017: 1,5-0,5 vs Maxime Vachier Lagrave 2016: 3.0-1.0 vs Sergey Karjakin 2015: 2.0-0.0 vs Yu Yangyi 2015: 1,5-0,5 vs Maxime Vachier Lagrave 2015: 3.0-2.0 vs Arkadij Naiditsch 2012: 2.0-0.0 Fabiano Caruana ellen 2011: 1.5-0.5 vs Vassily Ivanchuk 2007: 3.0-2.0 vs Alexander Onischuk
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