Fischer Random Chess Day 2: Nakamura Blunders Queen

Fischer Random Chess Day 2: Nakamura Blunders Queen

At the end of the second day, Magnus Carlsen took the lead in the unofficial Fischer random (chess960) world championship match versus Hikaru Nakamura. The American grandmaster was defending a theoretically drawn endgame but with little time on the clock and no increment, a mistake was easy to make.

The second day of Fischer Random chess meant a second, completely new starting position for the players. This time it was Nakamura who could start as White.

Carlsen received the support from dozens of spectators and also the mayor of Bærum, who said she was proud to be able to (financially) support an event in the area where Norway's world champion grew up.
INFO LIVE PGN

What an honour when the Prime Minister of Norway,Erna Solberg, opens the GM H ikaru - Magnus Carlsen match!

[Event "FRchess"] [Site "Hovikodden, Norway"] [Date "2018.02.10"] [Round "4"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Result "1-0"] [Variant "chess 960"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "rbqnnkbr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RBQNNKBR w HAha - 0 1"] [PlyCount "135"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. d4 c5 2. dxc5 Qxc5 3. f3 Qc7 {A battery against the kingside as early as move three. Nakamura wants to prevent the castling.} 4. Qd2 f5 5. c4 Bxc4 6. Bxf5 {A very promising opening! Finally there is no symmetry straight from the beginning.} Nd6 7. Bc2 Nc6 8. Rc1 Bf7 9. Bb3 O-O 10. Bxf7+ Nxf7 11. e4 { Carlsen got slightly better pawn structure which is a long-term plus. Now he needs to catch up with the development.} e6 12. Ne3 a6 13. Bf2 ({If} 13. Nc4 { then} Ba7 14. Bxa7 Rxa7 {with a slightly more pleasant position for White.}) 13... Nfe5 14. Nd3 Nxd3 15. Qxd3 b5 ({Perhaps it was better to finally allow the castling and develop the queenside rook with} 15... Ba7 16. O-O Rad8) 16. Qd2 Qb7 17. O-O Bf4 18. Bg3 Bxg3 19. hxg3 {White has obvious pressure along the c- and d-files. But will just one weakness on d7 be good enough for a tangible advantage?} Rac8 ({Interesting was} 19... Ne5 {when the accurate} 20. Rc5 ({The tactical idea behind the move is revealed in the line} 20. Rfd1 Rxf3 $1) 20... Nf7 21. Rd1 {keeps a slight advantage for White.}) 20. Ng4 $5 { Total chess. Carlsen tries to combine the play along the central files with kingside activity.} ({I suspect that around here both players calculated the consequences of possible rook endgames arising after:} 20. Rfd1 Ne5 21. Rxc8 Rxc8 22. Qd4 Nc4 23. Nxc4 Rxc4 24. Qxd7 Qxd7 25. Rxd7 Rc2 26. Ra7 Rxb2 27. Rxa6 Kf7 {The extra pawn is most likely not winning.}) 20... Ne7 21. Qg5 Ng6 ({ Similar is} 21... Rxc1 22. Rxc1 d6) 22. Rxc8 Rxc8 23. Rd1 Rc2 {The active defense had served Nakamura well so far.} ({Maybe a bit more subtle was} 23... Qb6+ 24. Kh2 ({The other choice is a slight advantage into the knight and rook endgame} 24. Qe3 Qxe3+ 25. Nxe3 Nf8) 24... Rc5 25. Qe3 Qc7 {when Black has much improved his position.}) 24. Qd8+ Nf8 25. Kh2 $1 {An important move. The king steps away from possible checks along the a7-g1 diagonal thus preventing any counter-attack.} ({Much weaker was} 25. Ne5 $6 Qa7+ 26. Kh2 Qf2 27. Rg1 Qc5 {when it is only White who needs to worry.}) 25... Rc5 ({The pawn is not edible:} 25... Rxb2 26. Ne5 $1) 26. Rd6 ({Once again Carlsen rejects an endgame with minor pieces, possible after} 26. b4 Qc7 27. Qxc7 Rxc7 28. Rd6 Ra7 29. Ne5 {with a difficult endgame for Black.}) 26... b4 ({Stronger was the immediate} 26... Qa7 {which would most likely forced a beter version of the aforementioned endgame after} 27. Qb6 Qxb6 28. Rxb6 Rc2 29. Rxa6 Rxb2 30. Ne5) 27. Rb6 Qa7 28. e5 $1 {Not only stopping mate, but preparing one.} ({Surely not } 28. Rb8 $4 Rh5+) 28... Rc8 29. Qe7 Ng6 $1 {The only defense.} ({Here the rook was poisoned.} 29... Qxb6 {leads to mate after} 30. Nf6+ gxf6 ({Or} 30... Kh8 31. Nh5) 31. exf6) 30. Qxb4 h5 31. Rb7 ({Centralization} 31. Nf2 $5 Nxe5 32. Ne4 {was looking good as well.}) 31... Qc5 ({Nakamura definitely had hard time choosing between various defensive set-ups. The one arising after} 31... Rc4 $5 32. Qxc4 Qxb7 33. Nf2 Nxe5 {was one of those.}) 32. Qe4 hxg4 33. Qxg6 Qd5 ({Or} 33... gxf3 34. Rxd7 Qxe5 35. Qf7+ Kh7 36. Qxf3 {which would be similar to the game.}) 34. Rb3 gxf3 35. Rxf3 Rf8 ({Another poisoned pawn} 35... Qxe5 $2 36. Qf7+ Kh7 37. Rf4) 36. Rd3 Qxe5 37. Rxd7 Rf5 {Nakamura activated his pieces to the maximum and Carlsen has no choice but to swap the rooks off.} 38. Rd8+ Rf8 39. Rd7 Rf5 40. Rd8+ Rf8 41. Rxf8+ Kxf8 42. b4 {Finally a queen endgame arose where the extra pawn by White matters (extra king safety) but the lack of pawns left on the board makes the position objectively draw.} Qe2 43. a4 Qa2 44. a5 Qc4 45. Qb1 Kg8 46. Qe1 Kh7 ({Or} 46... Kf7 47. Qf2+ Ke8 48. Qb6) 47. Qe3 Qxb4 48. Qd3+ g6 49. Qxa6 Qc5 50. Qb6 Qh5+ 51. Kg1 Qd1+ 52. Kf2 Qd2+ 53. Kf3 g5 {There were other moves that would have held.} (53... Qd3+ 54. Kf4 Qf5+ 55. Ke3 Qg5+) (53... Qd5+ 54. Ke3 Qxg2) 54. Qxe6 Qxa5 55. Kg4 Qa8 56. Qf7+ Kh8 57. Qh5+ Kg7 58. Qxg5+ {A second pawn was won, but this should not change the assesment of the position. Black should hold with careful defense. The extra possibility that Carlsen has now is to trade the queens thanks to his more advanced pawn and win the arising pure king and pawn endgame.} Kh8 59. Kh3 Qa1 60. Qd8+ Kg7 61. Qe7+ Kg8 62. g4 Qc3+ 63. Kh4 Qb2 64. Qe8+ Kg7 65. Qd7+ Kg6 66. Qd6+ Kg7 67. Qd5 Kg6 $4 {A tragical oversight.} ({Many moves were still holding, for example} 67... Qf2+ 68. Kh5 Qe2) 68. Qg8+ {Black resigned as he either loses the queen or gets mated.} (68. Qg8+ Kh6 (68... Kf6 69. Qh8+) 69. g5#) 1-0
[Event "FRchess"] [Site "Hovikodden, Norway"] [Date "2018.02.09"] [Round "1"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [Annotator "Dejan"] [Variant "chess 960"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "nnqrbbkr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/NNQRBBKR w HDhd - 0 1"] [PlyCount "100"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. c4 {The "English opening." It is logical to open the road for the knighs.} c5 2. Nc3 e6 {Also very logical decision. Nakamura is ready to bother the knights.} 3. Nc2 Nb6 4. e3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. d4 {This is probably not what Carlsen hoped for, but he needs to fight for the center.} cxd4 7. Nxd4 Nc6 8. Nxd5 Rxd5 {As a result of the central operations some pawns and pieces disappeared and the position became quite dry.} 9. Nf3 ({It is tempting to develop the bishop with a tempo} 9. g3 e5 10. Bg2 {until one spots the nasty} Rc5 $1) ({White can proceed with the trades} 9. Nxc6 Qxc6 10. Bc3 Rxd1 11. Qxd1 f6 {and that would be similar to the game.}) 9... Qd8 {Centralizing the queen.} ({Or} 9... Rxd1 10. Qxd1 Be7 {with equality.}) 10. Rxd5 Qxd5 11. a3 Bd6 12. Be2 ({Nothing changes} 12. Bc4 Qe4 13. O-O O-O) 12... O-O 13. O-O {As a result of the opening we have a solid, symmetrical, equal position.} Ne7 14. Bc3 Ba4 15. Qb1 Rc8 16. Rc1 Ng6 17. h3 ({Maybe the immediate} 17. Bd3 $5 b6 (17... Bc6 18. Rd1 $1) 18. Be4 Qb5 19. g3 {intending h2-h4-h5-h6 would have brought more life into the game. (Besides the fact that it would made Simon happy).}) 17... b6 18. Bd3 Be7 19. Be4 Qd7 20. Ne5 Nxe5 21. Bxe5 Rxc1+ 22. Qxc1 Qd1+ {More and more pieces disappear from the board.} ({Also good was} 22... f6 23. Bd4 Bd6 24. Qc4 Bb5) 23. Qxd1 Bxd1 24. Bc6 Bb3 ({Or} 24... f6 $5 25. Bb8 a5 26. Bc7 Bc5 {with rock solid position.}) 25. Kf1 Bf6 26. Bxf6 Bc4+ 27. Ke1 gxf6 28. Kd2 Kf8 29. Kc3 Bf1 30. f4 Ke7 31. Kd4 Kd6 32. Bf3 f5 {Intending f7-f6 and then e6-e5.} 33. e4 fxe4 34. Kxe4 f5+ 35. Kd4 h6 36. b4 Bb5 37. g4 Bf1 38. gxf5 exf5 { With just one weakness on f5 Black can never lose.} 39. h4 Bb5 40. Bd1 Bd7 41. Bb3 Bc8 42. Bc2 Be6 43. Bb1 Bc8 44. Bd3 Bd7 45. Kc4 Kc6 46. Bf1 Be6+ 47. Kd4 Kd6 48. Bg2 Bc8 49. Bd5 Bd7 50. Bb7 Be6 1/2-1/2 [Event "FRchess"] [Site "Hovikodden, Norway"] [Date "2018.02.09"] [Round "2"] [White "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [Variant "chess 960"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "nnqrbbkr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/NNQRBBKR w HDhd - 0 1"] [PlyCount "83"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [TimeControl "600"] 1. e4 ({In the break between the games, the Chess.com live audience took on Yasser Seirawan in the #ChallengeYasser segement of the live broadcast. It went like this:} 1. d4 d5 2. Nc3 e6 3. Nb3 Nd7 4. e4 Nab6 5. exd5 Nxd5 6. Nxd5 exd5 7. Bd2 Nf6 8. Bg5 Be7 9. Re1 Qd7 10. Qe3 Kf8 11. Nc5 Bxc5 12. dxc5 Ng4 13. Qe7+) 1... c5 {The Sicilian it is ;)} 2. d4 cxd4 3. Rxd4 d6 ({It was quite tempting to develop the knights with tempos:} 3... Nc6 4. Rd1 Nb6) 4. c4 { A Maroczy bind attempt.} b5 {And a typical attack of it.} 5. Nb3 Nc6 6. Rd1 bxc4 7. Bxc4 Nb6 8. Be2 g6 9. Bc3 f6 {A provocative decision. Carlsen wants to keep the dark-squared bishop, but this could later embarrass the queen along the h6-c1 diagonal. In the meantime, the e5-square is secured for the black knight.} ({Here after the possible} 9... Bg7 10. O-O {(My awesome Komodo actually does play these moves!)} O-O $1 {it will be almost a perfect Dragon (or KID if you like).}) 10. h4 {A witty idea in return.} ({There was nothing wrong with} 10. O-O) 10... h5 11. Rh3 $1 {Nakamura brings the rook into the game in a "French" way.} Bf7 12. Rg3 Ne5 ({Better seems to strike the center at once with} 12... d5 13. exd5 Nxd5 14. Bd2 Kh7 15. Nc3 {with approximate equality.}) 13. Bxe5 {Played without prejudicies.} ({Black would be doing great after} 13. Qd2 Bh6 14. Qe1 Bf4 15. Rh3 Kg7) 13... dxe5 ({The other capture was also possible-} 13... fxe5 {Apparently Carlsen disliked the closed distance between his king and the white queen after} 14. Qg5 {But the sharp (and non-forced) line after} Qd7 15. Bxh5 Bh6 16. Qg4 Bf4 17. Bxg6 Qxg4 18. Rxg4 Bxg6 19. Rxg6+ Kf7 20. Rg4 Nd7 {trapping the white rook, proves that the line is playable for the second player.}) 14. Rc3 Rxd1+ 15. Qxd1 Qa8 16. N1d2 ( {More precise was} 16. Qc2 Bh6 17. Rc7 O-O 18. Ba6 $1 {with advantage for White.} ({Rather than} 18. Rxe7 Rc8 19. Rc7 Rxc7 20. Qxc7 Qxe4 {when Black is fine (at least).})) 16... Bh6 17. Rc7 {The pressure along the open file compensates White for the opponent's bishop pair.} Qb8 18. Qc2 O-O ({Carlsen intuitively feels that his king should stay away from the seventh rank. Curious is the line:} 18... Kg7 19. Ba6 ({An important difference in comparison to the game is the line} 19. Rxe7 Rc8 20. Bc4 $1 {which makes use of the pin.}) 19... Bxd2 20. Nxd2 Na8 $5 21. Rxe7 Qd6 22. Rxa7 Qb6 {which forces} 23. Rxf7+ Kxf7 24. Bf1 {with a probable draw.}) 19. Ba6 $1 {Activity is more important than material.} ({Not} 19. Rxe7 Rc8 20. Qd1 ({Or} 20. Qd3 Bf8 {winning the exchange.}) 20... Rd8 $1 ({Here} 20... Bf8 21. Rxf7 Kxf7 22. g4 { provides some counter-attacking chances to White.}) 21. Qc2 Qd6 {and Black wins material.}) 19... Bxd2 $1 {See the last comment.} (19... Re8 20. Nf1 { would be too gloomy to anyone to stand.}) 20. Nxd2 Rd8 21. Nf1 {Nakamura misses his chance.} ({The American GM rejected the obvious} 21. Rxe7 Qd6 22. Rxa7 Qxd2 23. Qc7 {because of the line:} Rd7 ({Perhaps} 23... Qe1+ {provides more drawing chances to Black after} 24. Kh2 Rd7 ({But not} 24... Rf8 25. Qxb6 Qxe4 26. Qxf6 Qxg2+ 27. Kxg2 Bd5+ 28. Kg3 Rxf6 29. Bb7 {with hopeless rook endgame.}) 25. Qxb6 Rxa7 26. Qb8+ Kg7 27. Qxa7 Qxe4 {although the impression is that White should be able to consolidate.}) 24. Qxb6 Rxa7 {now he only saw} 25. Qxa7 ({In his calculations Nakamura missed the important intermediate check } 25. Qb8+ $1 Kg7 26. Qxa7 Qxb2 27. a4 {when again the black king is forced to the seventh rank and this proves deadly for Carlsen who does not have the Bf7-c4 counterplay as in the main line. After} Qb1+ 28. Bf1 Qxe4 29. a5 { the outside passer should decide the outcome of the game.}) 25... Qxb2 26. a4 { with an "obvious draw" (Nakamura). For instance} Qb1+ 27. Bf1 Bc4 $1) 21... Rd7 22. Rxd7 Nxd7 23. Bc4 {Now it is equal.} Qd6 24. Ne3 Qd4 25. b4 {After this inaccuracy it becomes slighly more equal for Black...} ({More accurate was} 25. Bxf7+ Kxf7 26. Qc7 ({Or} 26. Qc4+) 26... Ke8 27. g3 {when White does not risk anything.}) 25... Nb6 26. Bxf7+ Kxf7 27. Qb3+ Kf8 28. Qb1 Nc8 $1 {The knight is nicely rerouted into the center.} 29. Nf1 ({Or else the e4 pawn will drop after} 29. a4 Nd6) 29... Nd6 30. Ng3 Nb5 {Surprisingly, this natural move allows counter-play.} ({Carlsen would have held everything under control with} 30... Qc3 $1) 31. a3 $1 {Very strong. Nakamura frees his queen.} Qc4 ({If} 31... Nxa3 32. Qc1 Qxb4 33. Qh6+ Kf7 34. Qh7+ Ke6 35. Qxg6 {and it is anyone's game.}) ({But perhaps it was not too late for} 31... Qc3 $1) 32. Qd1 Nd4 ({ Once more} 32... Nxa3 33. Qd8+ Kf7 34. Qh8 Qxb4 35. Qh7+ Ke6 36. Qxg6 {allows sufficient counterplay to White.}) 33. Qd2 Kg7 34. Kh2 {Prepares f2-f4.} Qc2 ({ If} 34... Qb3 35. Qc1) 35. Qe3 a6 36. f4 exf4 37. Qxd4 fxg3+ 38. Kxg3 Qb3+ ({ The last chance was} 38... Qe2 $1 {although White has} 39. e5 $1 fxe5 40. Qd7 { which should also end in a draw.}) 39. Kh2 Qxa3 40. Qc5 Kf8 41. Qc8+ Kf7 42. Qc4+ {The queen either checks or sticks to the e7 pawn.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "FRchess"] [Site "Hovikodden, Norway"] [Date "2018.02.10"] [Round "3"] [White "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [Variant "chess 960"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "rbqnnkbr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RBQNNKBR w HAha - 0 1"] [PlyCount "87"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [TimeControl "600"] 1. f3 c6 2. c4 e5 3. d4 d6 4. Bd3 Ne6 5. e3 ({Nothing yields} 5. dxe5 dxe5) 5... Nf6 6. Qc3 exd4 7. exd4 h5 8. Be3 Bh7 9. d5 {The only way to fight for the initiative.} ({The position would slowly equalize after} 9. Bxh7 Rxh7 10. Nd3 d5) 9... cxd5 10. cxd5 Qxc3 11. Nxc3 Nc5 ({Better than} 11... Nc7 12. Bxh7 Rxh7 13. Rd1 {with a slight advantage for White.}) 12. Bxh7 Rxh7 13. Rc1 { It seems that White is better prepared for the arising endgame. The black queenside pieces seem especially awkward, while all White needs to do is to bring his kingside rook out.} a6 14. Bg5 {But here Nakamura goes astray.} ({ Better was} 14. b4 Ncd7 15. Nd3 Bc7 {with slight advantage for the first player thanks to his extra space and better bishop.}) 14... h4 $1 {A very strong idea! The rook gets into the game and this compensates for the crippled pawn structure.} ({Of course not} 14... Nfd7 $4 15. b4) (14... Ne8 {was playable though.}) 15. Bxf6 gxf6 16. Ne4 Kg7 ({Bad was} 16... Nxe4 17. Rc8+ Kg7 18. fxe4 {with a nasty pin on the eight rank.}) ({However, there was an argument for the immediate rook activity with} 16... Rh5 $5 {For example} 17. Nxf6 Rf5 18. b4 Rxf6 19. bxc5 dxc5 20. Rxc5 Ba7 {which is an improved version of the game for Carlsen.}) 17. Nxc5 dxc5 18. Rxc5 Ba7 19. Rc3 ({Worse was} 19. Rc7 Rh5 $1 20. Rxb7 Rxd5 {when White's position becomes critical.}) 19... Rh5 20. Rd3 (20. d6 {was more precise and White should hold after} Rd5 21. Rd3 Rxd3 22. Nxd3) 20... Re5 21. f4 Re4 22. Nf3 Rc8 $1 {Initiative is the key word! Carlsen simply wants mate.} ({Not} 22... Rxf4 23. g3 Rc4 24. Kg2 {with equality.}) 23. Rc3 Rce8 $1 {Another great decision.} (23... Rxc3 {would have left White off the hook after} 24. bxc3 Rxf4 25. Ke2) 24. Rc2 {The only move. The black rooks should not be allowed on the second rank.} ({Say} 24. g3 $2 Re2 25. Nxh4 Rf2+ 26. Kg1 Re1#) 24... Rxf4 25. d6 Rd8 ({Carlsen a misses golden opportunity.} 25... Re6 $1 {was most likely winning. It is counter-intuitive to let the pawn run, but Black has strong attack which prevails even a future queen. For example:} 26. Rd2 Rc4 27. Rd1 (27. d7 $2 Rc1+) (27. g3 $2 Rc1+ 28. Kg2 h3+) 27... Ree4 {Now if} 28. d7 Rc2 $1 {leads to mate:} 29. d8=Q Rf2+ 30. Kg1 Rxf3+ 31. Qd4 Bxd4+ 32. Rxd4 Re1#) 26. Rd2 Re4 27. d7 f5 28. g3 hxg3 29. hxg3 Re7 30. Rdh2 $1 {Active counter-play is what Nakamura does best.} ({ The alternative was the gloomy endgame after} 30. Rh5 Rexd7 31. Rxd7 Rxd7 32. Rxf5 Rd1+ 33. Ke2 Rb1 34. b3 Rb2+ 35. Nd2 Rxa2) 30... Rexd7 31. Rh7+ Kf6 32. Kg2 Be3 33. Rf1 Rg8 34. Kh3 ({Not} 34. Nh4 f4 $1) 34... Rd5 35. Nh4 Rg5 ({ Carlsen could have avoided the trade of kingside pawns with} 35... Rc8 $5 { with the idea} 36. g4 Rc1 37. Rxc1 fxg4+ 38. Kxg4 Bxc1 {and Black keeps decent winning chances.}) 36. g4 $1 f4 37. Ng2 Rd3 ({The last chance was} 37... Kg6 38. Rh8 Rd3 39. Kh4 {although this should also end in a draw.}) 38. Kh4 Rg7 39. g5+ {Now everything disappears.} Rxg5 40. Nxe3 Rxe3 41. Rxf4+ Kg6 42. Rhxf7 Rh5+ 43. Kg4 Rg5+ 44. Kh4 1/2-1/2 [Event "FRchess"] [Site "Hovikodden, Norway"] [Date "2018.02.10"] [Round "4"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Result "1-0"] [Variant "chess 960"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "rbqnnkbr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RBQNNKBR w HAha - 0 1"] [PlyCount "135"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. d4 c5 2. dxc5 Qxc5 3. f3 Qc7 {A battery against the kingside as early as move three. Nakamura wants to prevent the castling.} 4. Qd2 f5 5. c4 Bxc4 6. Bxf5 {A very promising opening! Finally there is no symmetry straight from the beginning.} Nd6 7. Bc2 Nc6 8. Rc1 Bf7 9. Bb3 O-O 10. Bxf7+ Nxf7 11. e4 { Carlsen got slightly better pawn structure which is a long-term plus. Now he needs to catch up with the development.} e6 12. Ne3 a6 13. Bf2 ({If} 13. Nc4 { then} Ba7 14. Bxa7 Rxa7 {with a slightly more pleasant position for White.}) 13... Nfe5 14. Nd3 Nxd3 15. Qxd3 b5 ({Perhaps it was better to finally allow the castling and develop the queenside rook with} 15... Ba7 16. O-O Rad8) 16. Qd2 Qb7 17. O-O Bf4 18. Bg3 Bxg3 19. hxg3 {White has obvious pressure along the c- and d-files. But will just one weakness on d7 be good enough for a tangible advantage?} Rac8 ({Interesting was} 19... Ne5 {when the accurate} 20. Rc5 ({The tactical idea behind the move is revealed in the line} 20. Rfd1 Rxf3 $1) 20... Nf7 21. Rd1 {keeps a slight advantage for White.}) 20. Ng4 $5 { Total chess. Carlsen tries to combine the play along the central files with kingside activity.} ({I suspect that around here both players calculated the consequences of possible rook endgames arising after:} 20. Rfd1 Ne5 21. Rxc8 Rxc8 22. Qd4 Nc4 23. Nxc4 Rxc4 24. Qxd7 Qxd7 25. Rxd7 Rc2 26. Ra7 Rxb2 27. Rxa6 Kf7 {The extra pawn is most likely not winning.}) 20... Ne7 21. Qg5 Ng6 ({ Similar is} 21... Rxc1 22. Rxc1 d6) 22. Rxc8 Rxc8 23. Rd1 Rc2 {The active defense had served Nakamura well so far.} ({Maybe a bit more subtle was} 23... Qb6+ 24. Kh2 ({The other choice is a slight advantage into the knight and rook endgame} 24. Qe3 Qxe3+ 25. Nxe3 Nf8) 24... Rc5 25. Qe3 Qc7 {when Black has much improved his position.}) 24. Qd8+ Nf8 25. Kh2 $1 {An important move. The king steps away from possible checks along the a7-g1 diagonal thus preventing any counter-attack.} ({Much weaker was} 25. Ne5 $6 Qa7+ 26. Kh2 Qf2 27. Rg1 Qc5 {when it is only White who needs to worry.}) 25... Rc5 ({The pawn is not edible:} 25... Rxb2 26. Ne5 $1) 26. Rd6 ({Once again Carlsen rejects an endgame with minor pieces, possible after} 26. b4 Qc7 27. Qxc7 Rxc7 28. Rd6 Ra7 29. Ne5 {with a difficult endgame for Black.}) 26... b4 ({Stronger was the immediate} 26... Qa7 {which would most likely forced a beter version of the aforementioned endgame after} 27. Qb6 Qxb6 28. Rxb6 Rc2 29. Rxa6 Rxb2 30. Ne5) 27. Rb6 Qa7 28. e5 $1 {Not only stopping mate, but preparing one.} ({Surely not } 28. Rb8 $4 Rh5+) 28... Rc8 29. Qe7 Ng6 $1 {The only defense.} ({Here the rook was poisoned.} 29... Qxb6 {leads to mate after} 30. Nf6+ gxf6 ({Or} 30... Kh8 31. Nh5) 31. exf6) 30. Qxb4 h5 31. Rb7 ({Centralization} 31. Nf2 $5 Nxe5 32. Ne4 {was looking good as well.}) 31... Qc5 ({Nakamura definitely had hard time choosing between various defensive set-ups. The one arising after} 31... Rc4 $5 32. Qxc4 Qxb7 33. Nf2 Nxe5 {was one of those.}) 32. Qe4 hxg4 33. Qxg6 Qd5 ({Or} 33... gxf3 34. Rxd7 Qxe5 35. Qf7+ Kh7 36. Qxf3 {which would be similar to the game.}) 34. Rb3 gxf3 35. Rxf3 Rf8 ({Another poisoned pawn} 35... Qxe5 $2 36. Qf7+ Kh7 37. Rf4) 36. Rd3 Qxe5 37. Rxd7 Rf5 {Nakamura activated his pieces to the maximum and Carlsen has no choice but to swap the rooks off.} 38. Rd8+ Rf8 39. Rd7 Rf5 40. Rd8+ Rf8 41. Rxf8+ Kxf8 42. b4 {Finally a queen endgame arose where the extra pawn by White matters (extra king safety) but the lack of pawns left on the board makes the position objectively draw.} Qe2 43. a4 Qa2 44. a5 Qc4 45. Qb1 Kg8 46. Qe1 Kh7 ({Or} 46... Kf7 47. Qf2+ Ke8 48. Qb6) 47. Qe3 Qxb4 48. Qd3+ g6 49. Qxa6 Qc5 50. Qb6 Qh5+ 51. Kg1 Qd1+ 52. Kf2 Qd2+ 53. Kf3 g5 {There were other moves that would have held.} (53... Qd3+ 54. Kf4 Qf5+ 55. Ke3 Qg5+) (53... Qd5+ 54. Ke3 Qxg2) 54. Qxe6 Qxa5 55. Kg4 Qa8 56. Qf7+ Kh8 57. Qh5+ Kg7 58. Qxg5+ {A second pawn was won, but this should not change the assesment of the position. Black should hold with careful defense. The extra possibility that Carlsen has now is to trade the queens thanks to his more advanced pawn and win the arising pure king and pawn endgame.} Kh8 59. Kh3 Qa1 60. Qd8+ Kg7 61. Qe7+ Kg8 62. g4 Qc3+ 63. Kh4 Qb2 64. Qe8+ Kg7 65. Qd7+ Kg6 66. Qd6+ Kg7 67. Qd5 Kg6 $4 {A tragical oversight.} ({Many moves were still holding, for example} 67... Qf2+ 68. Kh5 Qe2) 68. Qg8+ {Black resigned as he either loses the queen or gets mated.} (68. Qg8+ Kh6 (68... Kf6 69. Qh8+) 69. g5#) 1-0
  The Nakamura-Carlsen Fischer random match will see two more days of two long games, and on the final day, the two will play eight faster games. The (impressive) prize fund is just under $200,000. You can follow the match on the official website, Twitch.tv/chess or Chess.com/TV each day starting from 4:50 p.m. CET (10:50 a.m. Eastern, 7:50 a.m. Pacific) with commentary by GM Yasser Seirawan and IM Anna Rudolf.

Nakamura-Carlsen 960 Fischer Random Match, Day 2 | Part 1.

Bærum mayor Lisbeth Hammer Krog happily had a young chess fan do the honors for her. | Photo: Maria Emelianova

 

...as well as chess reporter and prolific Twitter personality Tarjei Svensen.

...who had Norwegian R&B artist Mira Craig in the studio on Saturday...

The camera operator of the NRK production...

Nakamura handled his loss pretty well and chatted much with his opponent.

Norway Chess organizer Kjell Madland making the first move, with match organizer Jøran Aulin-Jansson standing by.

Chess.com commentators Yasser Seirawan & Anna Rudolf enjoying the match.

Other kids preferred the kind of chess they knew.

Henrik Carlsen interviewed for NRK, and a local audience.

...where calculation is required from the very start.

Nakamura looking at a very fresh position...

Chier arbiter Hans Olav Lahlum getting ready.

Some very young fans attended the match on Saturday.

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