HAPPY BIRTHDAY, BORIS SPASSKY

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, BORIS SPASSKY

BORIS SPASSKY a legidősebb jelenleg élő világbajnok, és Anatolij Karpov egy távoli második helyen a 65 éves

Boris Vasilievich Spassky (Russian: Бори́с Васи́льевич Спа́сский; born January 30, 1937) is a Russian chess grandmaster. He was the tenth World Chess Champion, holding the title from 1969 to 1972. He is the oldest living former world champion.

Spassky won the Soviet Chess Championship twice outright (1961, 1973), and twice lost in playoffs (1956, 1963), after tying for first place during the event proper. He was a World Chess Championship candidate on seven occasions (1956, 1965, 1968, 1974, 1977, 1980, and 1985).

Spassky defeated Tigran Petrosian in 1969 to become World Champion, then lost the title to Bobby Fischer in the World Chess Championship 1972. He lost in the semifinal of the 1974 Candidates Tournament to Anatoly Karpov. He emigrated to France in 1976, becoming a French citizen in 1978. He continued to compete in tournaments but was no longer a major contender for the world title. In 2012 he left France and returned to Russia.

10 Best Chess Games by Boris Spassky

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Fischer – Spassky World Championship Match (1972)

Az 1972-es sakkvilágbajnokság versenysorozata zónaversenyekből, zónaközi versenyből, a világbajnokjelöltek párosmérkőzéses rendszerű egyenes kieséses versenyéből és a világbajnoki döntőből állt. A döntő a világbajnokjelöltek versenyén győzedelmeskedő amerikai Bobby Fischer, és az akkori világbajnok, Borisz Szpasszkij között zajlott. A versenyt Izland fővárosában, Reykjavíkban, a Laugardalshöll arénában vívták 1972. július 11. – augusztus 31. között. Az időszak kétségtelenül két legerősebb sakkjátékosának mérkőzését felfokozott politikai és médiaérdeklődés kísérte, az „évszázad sakkmérkőzésének”[* 1] is nevezik.

Fischer győzött 12½–8½ arányban, ezzel ő lett a sakkozás 11. világbajnoka, és megszakította a szovjet sakkozók negyedszázados hegemóniáját. Wilhelm Steinitz után ő a második amerikai állampolgár,[* 2] de egyben ő az első amerikai születésű sakkozó, aki elnyerte ezt a címet.

Spassky 2231 Games PGN

Spassky: “I still look at chess with the eyes of a child”

[pgn]

[Event “Bucharest”][Event “Bucharest”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1953.??.??”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Spassky”]
[Black “Smyslov”]
[Result “1-0”]
[PlyCount “67”]
[EventDate “1953.??.??”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Bg5 {The Leningrad Variation of the
Nimzoindian, which Boris Spassky used to love to play.} h6 5. Bh4 c5 6. d5 {
This reduces the flexibility of White’s center and should not lead to any
advantage for White.} d6 7. e3 exd5 8. cxd5 Nbd7 9. Bb5 O-O {9…Bxc3+! 10.
bxc3 a6 11.Bxd7+ Bxd7 is at least equal and possibly even better for Black,
who is poised to expand hisqueenside} 10. Nge2 Ne5 11. O-O Ng6 12. Bg3 Nh5 13.
Bd3 Nxg3 14. Nxg3 {Black has removed one of the potential attackers of his
weak d- pawn, and the other, the Nc3, departs quickly.} Ne5 15. Be2 Bxc3 16.
bxc3 {Black’s strong outpost at e5 and queenside majority might seem to give
him the advantage here but the strongpoint cannot be maintained and it is hard
to find useful employment for the B at c8.} Qh4 {This wrongheaded plan allows
White to obtain a better game. There simply isn’t enough attacking force here
to make a dent in White’s armor.} 17. f4 Ng4 18. Bxg4 Bxg4 {Capturing with the
queen would have saved precious time, as will become obvious.} 19. Qa4 Bc8 20.
e4 {Having eliminated the attack, Spassky establishes a dominating center.} Qg4
21. Qc2 h5 22. Rf3 b5 {Smyslov, the harmonist, is now simply flapping his
wings to no effect.} 23. e5 h4 24. Nf1 Bf5 25. Qd2 dxe5 26. fxe5 Bg6 27. Re1 h3
28. d6 {Although Black has the bishop, it is White who threatens to dominate
the light squares. Black should now try to place pressure on the pawn at e5,
but first he has to reposition the bishop.} Be4 29. Ne3 Qe6 {29…Qg5 30.Rg3
Qxe5? 31.Ng4 Qe6 32.Rxe4 Qxe4 33.Nf6+} 30. Rf4 Bxg2 31. Nf5 {Threatening mate
in a few moves after 32.Ne7+.} Rfe8 32. Re3 Rad8 33. Nxg7 Rxd6 {33…Kxg7 34.
Rg3+ Kf8 35.Rfg4} 34. Nxe6 1-0

[/pgn]

[pgn]
[Event “Zurich”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1984.??.??”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Spassky”]
[Black “Seirawan”]
[Result “1-0”]
[PlyCount “45”]
[EventDate “1984.??.??”]

1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. h3 O-O 6. Be3 a6 {White’s slow
development lets Black go for counterplay on the wings.} 7. a4 b6 {Black takes
aim at White’s center, but this move is risky. With the bishop off the c8-h3
diagonal White can often get an attack going quickly by e4-e5-e6 and jumping
in with the rest of his pieces. Black should play 7…d5.} 8. Bc4 Bb7 {With
White ready to jump in on e6 this is a mistake. He should try 8…Nc6, though
Black’s funny piece placement should let White keep the initiative.} 9. e5 Ne4
{Black hopes to trade pieces to dull White’s attack, but this loses time when
he can least afford it. 9…dxe5 would have been a better try, though White
has a plus after 10.dxe5 Qxd1+ 11.Rxd1 due to space and Black’s queenside.} 10.
Nxe4 Bxe4 11. Ng5 {Black underestimated this move. White offers a pawn to get
his pieces into the attack at warp speed.} Bxg2 {Madness. Black simultaneously
opens a line onto his own king and gives up two tempi. He would have done
better to try 11…d5 or Bf5, though it’s pretty bad anyway.} 12. Rg1 Bc6 {
Black is probably lost after this. 12…d5 would have closed the a2-g8
diagonal. White could reopen it by 13.Bb3 Be4 14.Nxe4 dxe4 15.Qg4, but at
least White would have one piece fewer to mate with.} 13. Qg4 e6 {Black
finally does something about the a2-g8 diagonal, but with five pieces already
aiming at his king, it’s too late.} 14. O-O-O Nd7 15. h4 dxe5 16. dxe5 Qe7 {
Black hopes to get his knight to f6 to defend his king, but…} 17. Rxd7 {
Spassky nixes that idea with this fine sac. White now has all his pieces
trained on Black’s king, while Black’s queen, queen bishop and queen rook
aren’t playing.} Bxd7 18. h5 f5 {Getting the queen in, but exposing e6.} 19.
Qh3 f4 {Trying to keep White’s bishop out, but now e6 is terminal.} 20. hxg6
Bxe5 {Opening the g-file looks suicidal, but it doesn’t matter anymore. After,
e.g. 20…h6 21.Bd2 White adds the possibility of Nf7-h6+ to his bag of
threats.} 21. Nxe6 Bxe6 22. Bxe6+ Kg7 23. gxh7+ 1-0

[/pgn]

[pgn]

[Event “World Championship”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1969.??.??”]
[Round “5”]
[White “Spassky”]
[Black “Petrosian”]
[Result “1-0”]
[PlyCount “56”]
[EventDate “1969.??.??”]

1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. d4 c5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 {The game has transposed
into a Semi-Tarrasch Variation of the Queen’s Gambit Declined, an opening
which can arise via a bewildering variety of move orders, even from the Caro
Kann (1.e4 c6)!} 6. e4 Nxc3 7. bxc3 cxd4 8. cxd4 Bb4+ 9. Bd2 Bxd2+ 10. Qxd2 O-O
11. Bc4 Nc6 12. O-O b6 13. Rad1 Bb7 {This is a very typical Semi-Tarrasch
position.} 14. Rfe1 Rc8 {A simple gl ance at the a2-g8 diagonal is sufficient
to encourage White to build a plan based on undermining the pawn chain f7-e6.}
15. d5 {But this may be premature. If Black plays 15…Na5!, then the bishop
will have to retreat, since the sacrificial attempt 16.dxe6 does not work.
Petrosian missed this chance.} exd5 16. Bxd5 {This is the correct capture. 16.
exd5 would have created a passed pawn, but it would be easily blockaded. And,
more important, the light squared bishop now has room to maneuver without
having to worry about Nc6- a5.} Na5 17. Qf4 Qc7 18. Qf5 Bxd5 {The pressure was
building at f7, so Black trades a piece which is not involved in the defense
for an attacking piece, almost always a good idea.} 19. exd5 {With the bishops
gone, the passed pawn is somewhat harder to blockade, and Black’s knight is
definitely offside. 19…Nb7 might have been best here.} Qc2 {Black simply has
no right to play so ambitiously when his position is inferior and White can
afford to ignore the threat at a2. On the other hand, White has no desire to
see the queens off the board, as the lady plays escort to the Pd5} 20. Qf4 Qxa2
21. d6 Rcd8 22. d7 {Spassky has achieved the goal of advancing his pawn to the
seventh rank, where it severely restricts the mobility of the Black forces. He
now needs a new plan to exploit his advantage, and it will involve
infiltration via the c-file} Qc4 23. Qf5 h6 24. Rc1 Qa6 25. Rc7 {The next
phase has been accomplished. Now the knight has to get into the act. Again, it
is important to consider a seemingly impossible goal. The knight belongs at c6.
Although that seems difficult to achieve, it is not.} b5 26. Nd4 Qb6 {26…b4
27.Qe5! with the threat of Nf5 Nc4} 27. Qc5 Rc8 {Nb7 Black had to do this, as
the alternatives fail. 27…b4 28.Re8! Qxd4 29.Rxf8+ Rxf8 30.Rxf8+ Kxf8 31.
Qc5+!! Qxc5 32.d8Q+} 28. Nc6 {And the knight reaches the desired square, after
which Spassky finishes the game beautifully. Nd6 Nxd8!! Nxf5} Nxc6 1-0

[/pgn]

[pgn]

[Event “Moscow”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1964.??.??”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Spassky”]
[Black “Korchnoi”]
[Result “1-0”]
[PlyCount “47”]
[EventDate “1964.??.??”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Bb7 5. Bg2 Be7 6. O-O O-O 7. Nc3 {This is
th e normal starting position of the Classical lines of the Queen’s Indian
Defense. Usually Black plays 7…Ne4 here, after which the knight can be
supported by an advance of the f-pawn.} d5 {This move has always had a bad
reputation because the pawn at d5 becomes a target and White can unleash the
power of the bishop at g2 by playing Ne5.} 8. cxd5 exd5 9. Ne5 {White’s forces
are better placed.} Qc8 {The idea is to defend the bishop at b7.} 10. Bg5 Qe6 {
Now the queen guards the minor pieces on the kingside. But Her Majesty is
ill-suited to the role of a chaperone!} 11. Rc1 c5 {Black takes advantage of
the fact that the pawn on d4 must remain in place to guard the knight at e5.
But White has a very powerful reply.} 12. Nd3 {The knight threatens a fork at
f4, attacking pieces at d5 and e6. Right now it doesn’t seem so dangerous, but
Spassky will quickly eliminate the support of that square.} cxd4 13. Bxf6 Bxf6
{Now White has a combination which wins the game.} 14. Nxd5 {The threats are
Nc7 and Nxf6+, so Black must capture.} Bxd5 15. Nf4 {This fork is the heart of
the combination.} Qd6 16. Nxd5 {There are still tremendous threats at c7 and
f6!} Bg5 {16…Bd8 17.Nf4 Nc6 18.Rxc6} 17. f4 Bd8 18. Nc3 {This is made
possible by the fact that the pawn at d4 is pinned.} Na6 {18…Qc5 19.Na4} 19.
Bxa8 {The rest is easy.} Qb8 20. Nd5 Qxa8 21. Qxd4 Nc5 22. b4 Ne6 23. Qd3 Re8
24. e4 1-0

[/pgn]

[pgn]

[Event “Belgrade”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1992.??.??”]
[Round “12”]
[White “Spassky”]
[Black “Fischer”]
[Result “1-0”]
[PlyCount “107”]
[EventDate “1992.??.??”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 O-O 6. Be3 Nc6 7. Nge2 a6 8. h4 {
A very unusual move in this position, but it can lead to more normal lines if
White chooses to transpose.} h5 9. Nc1 {This is the real new idea. It is
perhaps not an appropriate move in this position, though the real test does
not come in the present game. 9.Qd2 Rb8 is also possible.} e5 {9…Rb8!? 1 0.
Nb3 Bd7 is more consistent with Black’s strategy, aiming for an early break
with b5.} 10. d5 Ne7 {10…Nd4 is probably stronger.} 11. Be2 Nh7 {Black
prepares to launch kingside counterplay with f7-f5, after which the pawn at h4
can become very weak. His knights suffer from the lack of entry squares on the
kingside, a situation brought about by 8…h5.} 12. Nd3 {White now contr ols
f4 as well as g5, so there really is no possibility of kingside counterplay
for Black.} f5 13. a4 {White prevents Black from playing a freeing b7-b5. This
shuts down any queenside action on Black’s part.} Nf6 14. Nf2 {This is the
logical continuation of White’s strategy, limiting Black’s counterplay at each
turn and taking control of more squares, in this case g4 and e4.} a5 {A simply
horrible move. it prevents a4-a5, but eliminates any chance of getting in
b7-b5.} 15. Qc2 c5 {Another error, but a consistent follow-up to the previous
mistake. Fischer must have underestimated White’s potential energy on the
kingside. 15…f4 16.Bd2 Bh6 17. g3 fxg3 18.Bxh6 gxf2+ was a better plan.} 16.
O-O-O b6 17. Rdg1 Nh7 18. Nb5 Kh8 {Pointless, since the knight at e7 cannot be
brought to h6 because White will plant a pawn at g5.18…f4 might still be
best, for example 19.Bd2 Rf7 20.g4 fxg3 21.Rxg3 Nf8 22.Nh3 Bxh3 23.Rgxh3} 19.
g4 {The prelude to a direct kingside attack, which is difficult to counter.
The main basis of the attack is the weakness of g6.} hxg4 20. fxg4 f4 {Much
too late.} 21. Bd2 {It is now clear that Black has no counterplay, and his
king is in danger on the h-file.} g5 {Fischer did not want to endure White’s
persistent pressure, but this is a desperate sacrifice which only hastens the
end.} 22. hxg5 Ng6 23. Rh5 {The threat is 24.Rhg1.} Rf7 24. Rgh1 Bf8 25. Qb3
Rb8 26. Qh3 {White dominates the entire board and the success of his attack is
beyond question.} Rbb7 27. Nd3 {This is a decisive transfer of White’s knight
to the blockading square f3.} Kg8 28. Ne1 Rg7 {28…Qe8 is possibly a bit more
resistant, but there are serious problems anyway.} 29. Nf3 Rbf7 30. Rh6 {
Desperation, but well justified.} Qd7 31. Qh5 {Strong and simple. There is no
way to save the knight.} Qxg4 32. Rxg6 Qxh5 33. Rxg7+ Rxg7 34. Rxh5 Bg4 {Black
is just down a piece here.} 35. Rh4 Bxf3 36. Bxf3 Nxg5 37. Bg4 {A last finesse.
Black cannot capture at e4 because of the check at e6.} Rh7 38. Rxh7 Kxh7 39.
Kc2 Be7 {39…Nxe4 40.Bf5+} 40. Kd3 Kg6 41. Nc7 Kf7 42. Ne6 Nh7 43. Bh5+ Kg8 {
43…Kf6 44.Be1! and Black’s king must worry about getting mated!} 44. Be1 Nf6
45. Bh4 Kh7 46. Bf7 Nxd5 {This regains a little material, but the win is still
simple.} 47. cxd5 Bxh4 48. Bh5 Kh6 49. Be2 Bf2 50. Kc4 Bd4 51. b3 Kg6 {Black’s
king cannot protect his soldiers.} 52. Kb5 Kf6 53. Kc6 Ke7 54. Ng7 1-0

[/pgn]

[pgn]
[Event “Soviet Championship”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1960.??.??”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Spassky”]
[Black “Bronstein”]
[Result “1-0”]
[PlyCount “45”]
[EventDate “1960.??.??”]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 d5 4. exd5 Bd6 {4…Nf6 is normal, but Bronstein
loves to improvise.} 5. Nc3 Ne7 6. d4 O-O 7. Bd3 Nd7 {Black should play 7…c6
to eliminate the cramping pawn on d5.} 8. O-O h6 {Black feared a possible Ng5,
but this is a serious loss of time. He should have played 8…Nf6.} 9. Ne4 {
White gives up a pawn to get his pieces into attacking positions with gain of
time.} Nxd5 10. c4 Ne3 11. Bxe3 fxe3 12. c5 Be7 {Playing to hold the e3 pawn
by 12…Bf4 gets into trouble by 13 g3 and now neither 13…Bg5 14 Nfxg5 hxg5
15 Qh5 nor 13…f5 14 Nc3 Bg5 15 h4 Be7 16 Nd5 is any good.} 13. Bc2 Re8 {
Black sees the approaching attack on h7 and thus doesn’t want his knight
traded off after 13.. .Nf6 14 Qd3 Nxe4 15 Qxe4, but that might be better than
the text, which gives White an extra tempo to build up.} 14. Qd3 e2 {Black
doesn’t like the looks of 14…Nf8 15 Ne5 and tries to break up White’s
battery, but…} 15. Nd6 {White gives up a whole rook just for one tempo to
attack f7. Black should play 15…Bxd6 16 Qh7+ Kf8 17 cxd6 exf1Q+ 18 Rxf1 cxd6
19 Qh8+ Ke7 20 Qxg7 Rg8 21 Re1+ Ne5 22 Qxh6 Be6, when he may get out alive.}
Nf8 16. Nxf7 exf1=Q+ 17. Rxf1 Bf5 {Desperation, but 17…Kxf7 18 Ne5+ Kg8 19
Qh7+ is a beautiful way to get mated and 17…Qd5 loses to 18 Bb3 Qxf7 19
Bxf7+ Kxf7+ 20 Qc4+ Kg6 21 Qg8.} 18. Qxf5 Qd7 19. Qf4 Bf6 20. N3e5 Qe7 21. Bb3
Bxe5 22. Nxe5+ Kh7 23. Qe4+ 1-0

[/pgn]

[pgn]
[Event “Leningrad”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1954.??.??”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Spassky”]
[Black “Melik Peshayev”]
[Result “1-0”]
[PlyCount “43”]
[EventDate “1954.??.??”]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. Qg4 {This was once considered a sharp
weapon for White, but now it has lost its sting.} Ne7 6. dxc5 {The main line
these days is 6.Nf3, a solid developing move.} Bxc3+ {6…Nbc6 7.Bd2 O-O 8.Nf3
f5 is considered a more reliable method of reaching a level game.} 7. bxc3 {
White’s tripled pawns are a real weakness, but there is some compensation in
terms of pressure on the kingside.} O-O 8. Nf3 Nbc6 9. Bd3 Ng6 {The knight can
be chased away by the advance of the h-pawn, a typical strategy in such
positions.} 10. Qh5 Nce7 11. h4 Qa5 {Black attac ks on the queenside, but
White is not really concerned about that part of the board.} 12. O-O Bd7 13.
Qg4 {The White queen gets out of the way so the h-pawn can advance.} Bb5 {It
is usually a good strategy to trade a piece which is not actively taking part
in the defense for a piece which is part of the attacking force.} 14. h5 Bxd3
15. cxd3 Qxc3 {15…Nh8 16.Qb4 White retains the extra pawn with a good
position.} 16. hxg6 Qxa1 17. gxh7+ {White has given up an idle rook, which
played no part in the attack, for the important defender at g6. Now Black
cannot afford to take the pawn at h7.} Kh8 {17…Kxh7 18.Ng5+ Kg8 Otherwise
there will be a discovered check which wins material.19.Qh5 Rfc8 20.Qxf7+ Kh8
21.Qh5+ Kg8 22. Qh7+ Kf8 23.Nxe6+ Kf7 24.Ng5+ Ke8 25.Qh8+ Kd7 26.Qxg7 With the
nasty threat of 27.e6+, with a discovered attack on the queen at a1.} 18. Bg5 {
Black must now give up the queen for the rook, or lose the knight for nothing.}
Qxf1+ 19. Kxf1 Nf5 {Now Spassky finishes with an elegant combination, based on
the weakness of the g7 square. The knight at f5 seems to hold things together,
but remember that White can play Nd4. Now find the solution..} 20. Bf6 Rac8 {
20…gxf6 21.exf6 Rg8 22.hxg8Q+ Rxg8 23.Qh5+} 21. Nd4 gxf6 22. exf6 {Black
resigned, as there is no defense.} 1-0

[/pgn]

[pgn]

[Event “Sochi”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1967.??.??”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Spassky”]
[Black “Langeweg”]
[Result “1-0”]
[PlyCount “57”]
[EventDate “1967.??.??”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 e6 4. Nc3 c5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e3 Nc6 7. Bc4 cxd4 8.
exd4 Nxc3 9. bxc3 Be7 10. O-O O-O 11. Bd3 b6 12. Qe2 Bb7 13. Bb2 Qd5 14. c4 Qh5
15. Be4 Rfe8 16. Rfd1 Na5 17. Bxb7 Nxb7 18. Rac1 Bf8 19. Rc3 Rec8 20. d5 Nc5
21. Re3 exd5 22. Rxd5 Qh6 23. Nd4 Na4 {Black’s forces are offside and White
has a huge army ready to do battle against the enemy king.} 24. Nf5 {Not only
does this attack the queen, but it also unleashes the power of the bishop at
b2. Black does not have time to capture it, because he must save the queen.}
Qc6 {Now the king is almost completely without defenders, so the sacrifices
begin.} 25. Bxg7 {Obviously the bishop cannot be captured because then Ne7+
would win the queen.} Qxd5 {Black hopes that White will capture the queen,
allowing the saving move 26…Rc1+. But White has a much stronger option.} 26.
Nh6+ {Now Black has no choice, there is only one legal move.} Kxg7 27. Qg4+ {
and here Black resigned, because 27…Kh8 allows 28.Qg8 mate, while capturing
the knight is no better:} Kxh6 28. Rh3+ Qh5 29. Rxh5# 1-0

[/pgn]

[pgn]

[Event “Siegen Olympiad”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1970.??.??”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Spassky”]
[Black “Kostro”]
[Result “1-0”]
[PlyCount “43”]
[EventDate “1970.??.??”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 dxc4 7. e4 g5 8. Bg3 b5
9. Be2 Bb7 10. O-O Nbd7 11. d5 cxd5 12. exd5 Qb6 13. dxe6 fxe6 14. Nd4 Bc5 15.
Ndxb5 O-O 16. Bf3 Bxf3 17. Qxf3 Rac8 18. Rad1 Qc6 19. Qe2 Nd5 {White’s fo rces
do not seem well-placed to attack the enemy king, in spite of the weaknesses
on the kingside. But the pawn at e6 is very weak, and White can use the idea
of interference to get at it.} 20. Nd6 Bxd6 21. Qxe6+ {Mission accompl ished!
Not only is the attack under way, but White will even recover the material
investment at d6.} Kg7 22. Bxd6 1-0

[/pgn]

[pgn]
[Event “Belgrade”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1992.??.??”]
[Round “20”]
[White “Spassky”]
[Black “Fischer”]
[Result “1-0”]
[PlyCount “85”]
[EventDate “1992.??.??”]

1. e4 c5 2. Ne2 Nf6 3. Nbc3 e6 4. g3 Nc6 {4…d5 is playable.} 5. Bg2 Be7 6.
O-O d6 {This gives White a free hand on the kingside and fails to achieve
Black’s opening objective: the advance d7-d5. Black should choose 6… g6
instead, and Fischer does so in game 22.} 7. d3 a6 {7…Rb8 is logical.} 8. a3
{8.h3 was played in Fischer-Garcia, Buenos Aires 1970.} Qc7 9. f4 {White
unleashes his kingside pawnstorm.} b5 10. Kh1 O-O 11. Be3 Bb7 12. Bg1 Rab8 13.
h3 Ba8 14. g4 {This shows the Closed Sicilian in its most aggressive form.} b4
{This is dubious, because it creates light-square weaknesses on the queenside.
Still, it is hard to find convincing alternatives, since White seems to have a
strong game all over the board.} 15. axb4 cxb4 16. Na4 Nd7 17. Qd2 Rfc8 18. b3
{Now White will be able to transfer a knight to a strong position at c4.} a5
19. g5 Bf8 20. Ra2 Ne7 21. Nd4 g6 {21…e5? is perhaps what Fischer originally
had in mind, but it doesn’t work: 22.fxe5! dxe5 23.Bh2 and the pin on the pawn
at e5 gives White the better game.} 22. Nb2 Bg7 23. Nc4 d5 {Fischer’s
psychology does not permit him to suffer without counterplay, so he tries to
introduce some complications.} 24. Nxa5 {Why not? The knight may be offside
for a while but Black is in no position to do anything about it.} dxe4 25. dxe4
e5 26. Ne2 exf4 {Otherwise the f-pawn will advance with devastating effect.}
27. Nxf4 Ne5 {Black’s outpost at e5 does not give sufficient counterplay, and
White easily eliminates it.} 28. Nd3 Rb5 29. Nxe5 Qxe5 30. Nc4 Qxg5 {Black
loses the exchange and really doesn’t get anything in return.} 31. Be3 Qh4 32.
Nd6 Bc3 33. Qf2 Qxf2 34. Rxf2 Rbb8 35. Nxc8 Rxc8 36. Ra7 {The infiltration of
the rook is decisive.} Kf8 37. Bh6+ Ke8 38. Bg5 f6 39. Bxf6 Bxf6 40. Rxf6 Bc6
41. Kg1 Bd7 42. Rd6 Bc6 43. Bf1 1-0

[/pgn]