Nakamura Wins Tata Steel Chess India Rapid

Nakamura Wins Tata Steel Chess India Rapid

Hikaru Nakamura won the rapid part of the inaugural Tata Steel Chess India tournament in Kolkata. The American grandmaster scored 1.5 on the final day, which was just enough to stay ahead of Levon Aronian who scored only 1/3.

 


Hikaru Nakamura nyete a 2018-as Tata Steel Chess rapidversenyt.

Az Indiai Calcuttában Hikaru Nakamura győzelmével fejeződött be a Tata Steel Chess India 2018 rapidverseny. Az amerikai nagymester veretlenül, félpontos előnnyel végzett az élen, az örmény Levon Aronjan és az indiai Pentala Harikrishna osztotta a második helyet. A torna meglepetésem hogy az exvilágbajnok Viswanathan Anand nyeretlen maradt, utolsó partijában egykori szekundánsától, Srya Shehkar Gangulytól vereséget szenvedett. A viadal zárásaként november 13-án és 14-én kétfordulós villámversenyre kerül sor.

Nakamura Wins Tata Steel Chess India Rapid

[Event "Tata Steel India - Rapid"] [Site "Kolkata"] [Date "2018.11.11"] [Round "8.4"] [White "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Black "So, Wesley"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A13"] [WhiteElo "2844"] [BlackElo "2808"] [PlyCount "118"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [Eventtype "rapid"] [Whiteteam "United States"] [Blackteam "United States"] [Whiteteamcountry "USA"] [Blackteamcountry "USA"] [CurrentPosition "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] { [Notes by Rakesh Kulkarni] The battle between the two American GMs as another American is playing for the World Championship crown in London. } 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 { As discussed earlier, Hikaru sticks to the line he excels at and has played countless games with this setup against several opponents OTB and also on chess.com } 2...Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.b3 Bd6 5.Bb2 O-O 6.Be2 dxc4 7.Bxc4 b6 8.Nc3 Bb7 9.d4 a6 10.O-O b5 11.Bd3 Nbd7 12.a4 b4 13.Nb1 c5 14.Nbd2 cxd4 15.Nxd4 Nc5 16.Be2 Rc8 17.Nc4?! { Considering the tournament situation, Nakamura is keeping it quiet and safe and not giving away too much to Wesley } ( 17.Rc1! { Getting the Rook to the open file was considerably better. } ) 17...Bb8 18.Qe1 e5 19.Nc2 a5 20.Rd1 Qe7 21.Nxa5 { Forcing a series of exchanges to simplify the position on the Queenside. } 21...Nxb3 22.Nxb3 Rxc2 23.Rd2 Rfc8 24.Qb1 R2c7 25.Bd3 Bd5? { an oversight by Wesley } ( 25...g6 { and Black is much better. } ) 26.Bxh7+ Kf8 27.Bc2 g6 28.Nc1 Qe6 29.Ne2 Ba2 30.Qd1 Kg7 31.Bd3 { White has the extra pawn but his pieces are cramped and black is nver worse here. } 31...Bb3 32.Qe1 Bxa4 33.Qa1 Ra7 34.Qb1 Rd7 35.Ba1?? { Complelely missing Black's threat } ( 35.Ng3 Rcd8 { Would have been a normal continuation } ) 35...Rb7?? { Nakamura explained later than Wesley touched the rook instantly by intending to play Rxd3. So, Now he had to play Rb7 as the Rook was touched and had no good sqaure to go to. } ( 35...e4! $19 ) ( 35...Rxd3 36.Qxd3 { This recapture was ovelooked by Wesley. } ( 36.Rxd3 Bc2 $19 ) ) 36.Ng3 b3 37.Kh1 Rh8 38.Ne4 Nxe4 39.Bxe4 Rb4 40.f4! { Naka creates complications at the right moment to equalize by create threats of his own. } 40...f6 41.Bd5 Qe7 42.Bc3 Rb6 43.Qe4 Bb5 44.Rb1 Bd7 45.Qf3 exf4 46.exf4 Bf5 47.Re2 Qd6 48.Rd1 Rh4 49.Bxb3 { A series of exchganes ensues and we simplify into a double Bishop endgame for both the players. } 49...Rxf4 50.Rxd6 Rxf3 51.Bxf6+ Kh6 52.gxf3 Bxd6 53.Re8 Rb8 54.Rxb8 Bxb8 55.Kg2 Bf4 56.Bd5 Bd7 57.Be4 Bc8 58.Bh4 g5 59.Be1 g4 { This save proved pivotal for Naka to stay in the lead as Levon lost this game to Harikrishna, thus giving Naka the sole lead. } 1/2-1/2
[Event "Tata Steel India - Rapid"] [Site "Kolkata"] [Date "2018.11.11"] [Round "8.1"] [White "Harikrishna, Pentala"] [Black "Aronian, Levon"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C67"] [WhiteElo "2743"] [BlackElo "2802"] [PlyCount "189"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [Eventtype "rapid"] [Whiteteam "India"] [Blackteam "Armenia"] [Whiteteamcountry "IND"] [Blackteamcountry "ARM"] [CurrentPosition "r1bqkb1r/pppp1ppp/2n2n2/1B2p3/4P3/5N2/PPPP1PPP/RNBQK2R w KQkq - 4 4"] { [Notes by Rakesh Kulkarni] } 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 { The Berlin again. It is not uncommon to see this being played at the highest level even in apid or blitz events. This was an understandable choice by Levon as his tournament situation demanded. } 4.O-O Nxe4 5.Re1 Nd6 6.Nxe5 Be7 7.Bf1 Nxe5 8.Rxe5 O-O 9.d4 Ne8 10.c4 Bf6 11.Re1 d5 12.cxd5 Qxd5 13.Be3 Be6 14.Nc3 Qd7 15.d5?! $146 ( 15.Bb5 Qd8 16.d5 Bf5 17.Qf3 Nd6 18.Bc5 Bg6 19.Ba4 a6 { Mastrovasilis, D (2559)-Berkes,F (2606) Heraklio 2007 } ) 15...Bf5 16.h3 Nd6 17.Bd4 Bxd4 18.Qxd4 a6 19.a4! { A nice way by Harikrishna to gain space on the Queenside and to fix the Black pawns by pushing the pawn to a5. } 19...Rfe8 20.a5 Rxe1 21.Rxe1 Re8 22.Re3 Rxe3 23.Qxe3 Qd8 24.b4 h6 25.Qe5 Qg5 26.b5 axb5 27.Nxb5 Bd7 28.Qxg5 hxg5 29.Nxc7 { Yes, White has picked up a pawn but the position still looks okay for Black. } 29...Kf8 30.f3 Ke7 31.Kf2 Kf6 32.Na8 Ba4 33.Nb6 Bb3 34.g4 Ke5 35.Ke3 f5! { When you have a material deficit, exchange pawns in the endgame. } 36.gxf5 Nxf5+ 37.Kf2 Kd4 { All of Black's pieces are more active than it's counterparts and Black has hug compensation for the pawn. } 38.Be2 Bc2 39.Bb5 Nd6 40.Bd7 Bf5 41.Be6 Bxe6? { Time pressure and maybe tournament pressure told on Levon as he now starts to go astray } ( 41...g6 { And White has no real way to progress } ) 42.dxe6 Ke5 43.Nd7+ Kxe6 44.Nc5+ Kd5 45.Nxb7! { This must have been missed by levon before he captured on the Bishop on e6 } 45...Nc4 ( 45...Nxb7 46.a6 Kc6 47.a7!! { A Knight is the worst defender against rook pawns. } ) 46.a6 Kc6 47.Nd8+ Kb6 48.Ne6 { Hari has won a pawn and threatening to clean up the kingside as well. } 48...g6 49.Nxg5 Kxa6 50.Nf7 Kb5 51.Nh8! Kc5 52.Nxg6 Kd5 53.h4 { The famous f and h pawns but we have Knights this time, not Rooks. } 53...Ke6 54.Nf4+ Kf5 55.Ne2 Nd2 56.Ng3+ Kg6 57.Ke3 Nc4+ 58.Kf4 { The position is lost for Black, thought White has to be really carfeful and not push his pawns too fast. } 58...Kh6 59.Kf5 Ne3+ 60.Ke4 Ng2 61.f4 Kh7 62.h5 Kg7 63.Ke5 Ne1 64.f5 Nf3+ 65.Ke4 Ng5+ 66.Kf4?! ( 66.Ke5 { was winning. } ) 66...Nf7 67.Ke4?! Kf6 68.Kf4 { Hari's previous moves have been sub par but he realls takes it too far with his next mistake. } 68...Kg7 69.Kf3?? Ne5+ ( 69...Kh6! { Holds for Black according to the machines, though very difficult to hold in a rapid game with seconds remaining on the clock. } 70.Kg4 Ne5+ 71.Kf4 Nd7 72.Ke4 Kg5! ) 70.Ke4 Kf6 71.Ne2 ( 71.Nh1!! { White had to find the incredible Nh1 with the idea of Nf2 and Ng4. } ) 71...Nf7 72.Kf4 Ne5 73.Nc1 Nc6 74.Nb3 Ne7 75.Nd4 Nd5+ 76.Kg4 Ne3+ 77.Kf4 Nd5+ 78.Ke4 Nc3+ { Up until this point Levon has been defending like a boss and keeping white at bay. } 79.Kd3 Nd5?? ( 79...Nb5!! { was the move Levon had to find to save the game and still be alive in the tournament. } 80.Nxb5 Kxf5 { And White can't defend the h pawn } ) 80.h6! { Now white is winning! } 80...Kf7 81.Ke4 Nf6+ 82.Kf4 Kg8 83.Kg5 Kf7 84.Ne6 Nh7+ 85.Kg4 Nf6+ 86.Kf4 Kg8 87.Kg5 Nd7 88.f6 Ne5 89.Kf5 Nf7 90.Ng5! Nh8 ( 90...Nxh6+ 91.Kg6 ) 91.Ke6 Ng6 92.f7+ Kh8 93.Kf6 Nf8 94.Ne6 Ng6 { One last trick by Levon. } 95.f8=Q+ ( 95.Kxg6 { is stalemate } ) 1-0
[Event "Tata Steel India - Rapid"] [Site "Kolkata"] [Date "2018.11.11"] [Round "7.3"] [White "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Black "Harikrishna, Pentala"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C65"] [WhiteElo "2792"] [BlackElo "2743"] [PlyCount "105"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [Eventtype "rapid"] [Whiteteam "Russia"] [Blackteam "India"] [Whiteteamcountry "RUS"] [Blackteamcountry "IND"] [CurrentPosition "r4rk1/pppq1p2/1b1p3p/4p1pn/2N1P1b1/2PP2B1/PP3PPP/R2BQRK1 b - - 7 15"] { [Notes by Rakesh Kulkarni] } 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.d3 { The Anti-Berlin } 4...Bc5 5.O-O Nd4 6.Nxd4 Bxd4 7.c3 Bb6 8.Ba4 O-O 9.Bg5 h6 10.Bh4 d6 11.Nd2 g5 12.Bg3 Bg4 13.Qe1 Nh5 14.Bd1 Qd7 15.Nc4 f5? { A suicidal move by Hari. } 16.Nxb6 axb6 17.f3! Nxg3 18.hxg3 Bh5 19.exf5 Bf7 ( 19...Rxf5 20.g4 { wins. } ) 20.g4 { White is a clear pawn up for no apparent compensation. } 20...Kg7 21.Qd2 Qe7 22.Bb3 d5 23.Rae1 Qf6 24.Re3 c5 25.Qe2 b5 26.a3! c4! { Hari remains objective and tries to create as many problems as he can. } ( 26...d4 27.Bxf7 dxe3 28.Be6 { wins. This Petrosian-like exchange sacrifice was Karjakin's intention. } ) 27.Bc2 d4 28.Rxe5 dxc3 29.bxc3 Rxa3! { He gets his rook in to create some threats. } 30.Rxb5 Rxc3 31.d4 Qxd4+ 32.Qf2 Rd8 33.Be4 Rb3 ( 33...Qxf2+ 34.Kxf2 Rd2+ { Black has great chances to hold, thanks to his active pieces. } ) 34.Qxd4+ Rxd4 35.Rxb7 Rxb7 36.Bxb7 Kf6 37.Be4 h5 38.gxh5 Bxh5 39.Ra1 g4 40.Kf2 gxf3 41.gxf3 Rd6 { The position is really unpleasant for Black. He has no apparent idea or plan, has to sit tight and wait. } 42.Ke3 Bf7 43.Kf4 Rb6 44.Rh1 Rd6 45.Kg4 Rd2 46.Kf4 Rd6 47.Rh8! { Sergey has imporved his King's positon and is looking for an infiltration. } 47...Rd1 48.Rh6+ Kg7 49.Rc6 Rd8 50.Kg5 Re8 51.Rc5 ( 51.f6+ { was also winning. } ) 51...Rd8 52.Rc7 Re8 53.Bd5 { Everyting falls for Black. A nice technical win by Karjakin } 1-0
[Event "Tata Steel India - Rapid"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.11.11"] [Round "9.4"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Ganguly, Surya Shekhar"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B13"] [WhiteElo "2737"] [BlackElo "2608"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "74"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [Eventtype "rapid"] [CurrentPosition "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1.e4 { After so many years of cooperation the Player and the Second know everything about themselves and cannot surprise each other. } 1...c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 4.Bd3 { Fischer made this move popular with his wins against the Iron Petrosian. Nowadays it comes back into fashion. Very often White gets reversed QGD type of positions with an extra tempo. } 4...Nc6 5.c3 e6 6.Nf3 ( { Another way to develop is: } 6.Ne2 Bd6 7.Nd2 Nge7 8.f4 O-O 9.Nf3 f6 10.O-O Bd7 11.Qc2 { as in Kovalev,V (2636) -Riazantsev,A (2666) Sochi 2017 } ) 6...Bd6 7.O-O Nge7 8.Re1 O-O 9.Na3 $146 { A novelty. The knight is looking for the optimal square. } ( { An email predecessor saw interesting play after: } 9.h3 f6 10.c4 Nb4 11.Bf1 dxc4 12.Bxc4 Qc7 13.Qe2 a6 14.Bxe6+ Bxe6 15.Qxe6+ Kh8 16.Na3 Ned5 { with compensation for the pawn, Selin,S (2313)-Morley,P (2205) ICCF email 2009 } ) ( { The stnadart development of the knight might leave them workless- } 9.Ne5!? f6 10.Qh5 Nf5 ) ( { Please note that the typical sacrifice } 9.Bxh7+ Kxh7 10.Ng5+ { does not work due to } 10...Kg6 11.Qg4 f5 ) ( { Or } 9.Nbd2 f6 { and the white knights are not going anywhere. } ) 9...f6 ( { Anand was clearly not afraid of the doubling of his pawns: } 9...Bxa3 10.bxa3 { In return he gets rich play thanks to his bishop pair and the open files. For example } 10...b6? { Now allows the sacrifice: } ( { And } 10...f6 11.Qc2 g6 12.Rb1 { gives White plenty of play. } ) 11.Bxh7+ Kxh7 12.Ng5+ Kg6 13.Qg4 f5 14.Qg3 Kf6 15.Bf4 { with decisive threats. } ) 10.Nb5 Bb8 11.c4 Nb4 { With the clever intention to block the isolated pawn. } ( { Instead } 11...a6 { only pushes the white knight to a better positon. } 12.Nc3 ) ( { Likewise } 11...dxc4 12.Bxc4 { makes the bishop more active. } ) ( { There is an argument for the prophylactical } 11...Kh8!? { though. } ) 12.Bf1 dxc4 13.Bxc4 Nbd5 { The point of the maneuver. The d-pawn will not move forward any time soon(or ever). } 14.Nc3 Kh8 ( 14...Bd7 15.Qb3 { is awkward for Black. } ) 15.Qb3 a6! { Ganguly finds a clever way to bring his rook into life. } ( { White is better after } 15...b6 16.Bd2 Qd6 17.Nxd5 Nxd5 18.Rac1 ) 16.a4 b6 17.Bd2 Ra7 { This is what it was all about. The rook is ready to enter the battle, while the bishps can work from the back ranks. } 18.a5! { Nevertheless White's position looks more pleasant thanks to his space advantage. Anand decided to fix some dark squares and secure outposts for his knights. } ( { Interesting was also the immediate } 18.Nxd5!? Nxd5 ( 18...exd5 19.Bd3 ) 19.Rac1 ( { Here } 19.Bxd5 exd5 20.Bb4 Rg8 21.a5 { can be answered with } 21...Rb7 ) 19...Rc7 20.Qd3 { with slight edge for White in either case. } ( { Or } 20.h3 ) ) 18...b5 19.Bxd5 exd5 ( { The endgame after } 19...Nxd5 20.Nxd5 Qxd5 21.Qxd5 exd5 22.Bb4 Rg8 23.Rac1 { is very pleasant for White as he not only has the pen files, but can make very good use of the c5 outpost. } ) 20.h3 { Rules out the Bc8-g4 possibilities. Now Anand is ready to bring his knights to the optimal squares. He intends Nc3-a2-b4-d3-c5, and/or Bd2-b4. One can easily lose a game like that without even understanding where he had gone wrong. } 20...g5! { Not Ganguly! He is ready to fire back with his pieces on the kingside. The bishops are already attacking there and the rooks can quickly join them. they just need some open files. } 21.Na2 Nc6 ( { The immediate } 21...Rg8!? { might have been more accurate. } ) 22.Nb4 Nxb4 23.Bxb4 Rg8 24.Qa3 { Intends to throw in a spanner in Black's kingside busyness. } 24...g4 25.hxg4 ( { Not } 25.Be7? Rxe7 26.Qxe7 gxf3 { and Black wins material. } ) 25...Bxg4 26.Nh2?! { So far Anand played perfectly, but now goes into the wrong direction. The move looks solid, but is most likely based on a tactical oversight. } ( { After the correct: } 26.Nh4! { White keeps the situation under control and should be better. For example: } 26...Rag7 ( { Or } 26...Rf7 27.Re7 { trading some future attackers. } ) 27.Be7 Qc7 28.g3 { and Black has to think about defence. } ( { But not } 28.Bxf6?? Qh2+ 29.Kf1 Qh1# ) ) 26...Rag7 27.g3 ( { It was not too late to swap off a pair of active rooks with } 27.Re7! Bf5 28.Rxg7 Rxg7 ) ( { But perhaps it dawned to Anand that in case of the move that I suspect he prepared: } 27.Be7 { Ganguly has the fantastic resource: } 27...Be2!! 28.Bxd8 Rxg2+ 29.Kh1 Rxh2# ) 27...Bh3 { Suddenly all the black pieces are attacking and the threat of Bb8xg3 is real. } 28.Re3 ( { If } 28.Nf1 Bxf1 29.Kxf1 Qc8 ) ( { Or } 28.Kh1 Bxg3 ) 28...Bf4 29.Rf3 Qc7 30.Nf1 ( 30.Rxf4 Qxf4 ) 30...Bxf1 31.Kxf1 ( { Since else Black will get decisive attack- } 31.Rxf1 Bxg3 32.fxg3 Rxg3+ 33.Kf2 ( { Or } 33.Kh1 Rg2 34.Rh3 Qg7 35.Qe3 Rxb2 36.Rg1 Qxg1+ 37.Qxg1 Rxg1+ 38.Kxg1 Rxb4 { with decisive material gain. } ) 33...Rg2+ 34.Ke3 Re8+ 35.Kd3 Qc4# ) 31...Bxg3! { It happened! The white position collapses now. } 32.Qc3 ( { The sacrifice cannot be accepted- } 32.fxg3 Rxg3 33.Rxg3 Rxg3 34.Qa2 Qf4+ 35.Ke2 Rg2+ 36.Ke1 Qe4+ 37.Kd1 Qe2+ 38.Kc1 Qc2# ) 32...Qd7! { With the white king in the center Black wants the queens on the board. } ( { Avoiding the endgame } 32...Qxc3 33.bxc3 Bf4 34.Ke2 { which complicates matters. } ) 33.Ke2 ( { If } 33.fxg3 Qh3+ 34.Ke2 Re8+ 35.Kd2 Qg2+ 36.Kd1 Qg1+ ) 33...Re8+ 34.Kd2 Bh4 35.Re1 { Black is not only up pawn, but has the more secure king and active pieces. The next blunder makes his task easier. } ( 35.Kc2 { would have still fought on. } ) 35...Rxe1 36.Kxe1 Rg1+ 37.Ke2 Bg5 { There is no escape from the infiltration of the black queen along the e-file. Ganguly did not have the tournament of his life, but can be proud of his first game against the former world champion! } 0-1
[Event "Tata Steel India - Rapid"] [Site "Kolkata"] [Date "2018.11.11"] [Round "8.5"] [White "Sarin, Nihal"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2127"] [BlackElo "2737"] [PlyCount "102"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [Whiteteam "India"] [Blackteam "India"] [Whiteteamcountry "IND"] [Blackteamcountry "IND"] [Whiteclock "0:02:54"] [Blackclock "0:04:49"] [CurrentPosition "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.g3 dxc4 5.Bg2 c5 6.O-O Nc6 7.dxc5 Qxd1 8.Rxd1 Bxc5 9.Nbd2 c3 10.bxc3 O-O 11.Nb3 Be7 12.c4 Bd7 13.Bb2 Rfd8 14.Nfd4 Rac8 15.Nb5 b6 16.Nd6 Bxd6 17.Rxd6 Be8 18.Rd3 Nb4 19.Rxd8 Rxd8 20.Bc3 Na6 21.a4 Nd7 22.a5 Ndc5 23.Nxc5 Nxc5 24.axb6 axb6 25.e3 Rc8 26.Bf1 Bc6 27.Rb1 Nd7 28.f4 h6 29.Bd4 Be4 30.Rb4 Rb8 31.Bg2 Bxg2 32.Kxg2 f6 33.e4 e5 34.Be3 Kf7 35.h4 Rc8 36.h5 exf4 37.gxf4 f5 38.exf5 Kf6 39.Kf3 Kxf5 40.Bxb6 Nf6 41.Rb5+ Ke6 42.Re5+ Kd6 43.c5+ Kc6 44.Re7 Nxh5 45.Kg4 Nf6+ 46.Kf5 Rf8 47.Rc7+ Kd5 48.Kg6 Ne4 49.Kxg7 Rxf4 50.Kxh6 Rf6+ 51.Kg7 Rc6 1/2-1/2
[Event "Tata Steel India - Rapid"] [Site "Kolkata"] [Date "2018.11.11"] [Round "8.2"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E20"] [WhiteElo "2794"] [BlackElo "2792"] [PlyCount "95"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [Eventtype "rapid"] [Whiteteam "Azerbaijan"] [Blackteam "Russia"] [Whiteteamcountry "AZE"] [Blackteamcountry "RUS"] [CurrentPosition "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] { [Notes by Rakesh Kulkarni] } 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 { The Nimzo Indian defence } 4.f3 { True to his style and irrespective of the tournament situation, Shakh chooses an aggressive line. } 4...d5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3 c6 7.Bg5 O-O 8.e3 Nbd7 9.cxd5 exd5 10.Bd3 Re8 11.Qd2 h6 12.Bh4 Qa5 13.Ne2 b6 14.g4! { Shakh goes for it and why not? The pawn on h6 acts as a hook. So, White can open the g file faster. } 14...Ba6 15.Rg1 c5 { Classic Chess by Sergey. "When flank attack is initiated, open the centre!" } 16.Bxa6 Qxa6 17.Kf2 g5 18.Bg3 Re6 19.Kg2 Nf8 20.h4 Rae8 21.Bf2 Ng6 22.hxg5 hxg5 23.Rh1 { Shakh has finally managed to open up the h file for his rook. } 23...Qc4 24.Ng3 { The knight is heading to the lovely outpost on f5 to create havoc on Black's kingside. } 24...Rc8 25.Nf5 cxd4 26.cxd4 ( 26.Nxd4! { was much stronger. } ) 26...Qc2 27.Qe1 a5 28.Rc1 Qxc1 29.Qxc1 Rxc1 30.Rxc1 Ne7 31.Rc7 ( 31.Bg3! { It was important to activate the bishop and bring it to the strong square on e5. } 31...Nxf5 32.gxf5 Rxe3 33.Be5 { and Black is in serious trouble because of his weak King and the back rank threats. } ) 31...Kf8 32.a4 Ne8 33.Rb7 Nxf5 34.gxf5 Rc6 { Black's position has been unpleasant for quite some time but it's nothing new for the Minister of Defence Karjakin. } 35.e4! { White opens the position and creates a passed pawn in this famous type of endgames that are also known as the Fischer endgame. (Rook + Bishop vs Rook + Knight) } 35...dxe4 36.fxe4 Nd6 37.Rb8+ Ke7 38.f6+! Kd7 39.e5 { White's pawns have moved non-stop in the last moves and are creating a ruckus. } 39...Ne4 40.Kf3! { King must be used as a piece in the endgame } 40...Nc3 41.Kg4 Nd5 42.Rf8 Ke6 43.Rd8 Nf4 44.Be3 { Shakh keeps it simple and pockets the win. } 44...Nd5 45.Bxg5 Nc7 46.Be3 Nd5 47.Bd2 Nc7 48.Kf4 1-0
[Event "Tata Steel India - Rapid"] [Site "Kolkata"] [Date "2018.11.11"] [Round "8.2"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E20"] [WhiteElo "2794"] [BlackElo "2792"] [PlyCount "95"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [Eventtype "rapid"] [Whiteteam "Azerbaijan"] [Blackteam "Russia"] [Whiteteamcountry "AZE"] [Blackteamcountry "RUS"] [CurrentPosition "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] { [Notes by Rakesh Kulkarni] } 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 { The Nimzo Indian defence } 4.f3 { True to his style and irrespective of the tournament situation, Shakh chooses an aggressive line. } 4...d5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3 c6 7.Bg5 O-O 8.e3 Nbd7 9.cxd5 exd5 10.Bd3 Re8 11.Qd2 h6 12.Bh4 Qa5 13.Ne2 b6 14.g4! { Shakh goes for it and why not? The pawn on h6 acts as a hook. So, White can open the g file faster. } 14...Ba6 15.Rg1 c5 { Classic Chess by Sergey. "When flank attack is initiated, open the centre!" } 16.Bxa6 Qxa6 17.Kf2 g5 18.Bg3 Re6 19.Kg2 Nf8 20.h4 Rae8 21.Bf2 Ng6 22.hxg5 hxg5 23.Rh1 { Shakh has finally managed to open up the h file for his rook. } 23...Qc4 24.Ng3 { The knight is heading to the lovely outpost on f5 to create havoc on Black's kingside. } 24...Rc8 25.Nf5 cxd4 26.cxd4 ( 26.Nxd4! { was much stronger. } ) 26...Qc2 27.Qe1 a5 28.Rc1 Qxc1 29.Qxc1 Rxc1 30.Rxc1 Ne7 31.Rc7 ( 31.Bg3! { It was important to activate the bishop and bring it to the strong square on e5. } 31...Nxf5 32.gxf5 Rxe3 33.Be5 { and Black is in serious trouble because of his weak King and the back rank threats. } ) 31...Kf8 32.a4 Ne8 33.Rb7 Nxf5 34.gxf5 Rc6 { Black's position has been unpleasant for quite some time but it's nothing new for the Minister of Defence Karjakin. } 35.e4! { White opens the position and creates a passed pawn in this famous type of endgames that are also known as the Fischer endgame. (Rook + Bishop vs Rook + Knight) } 35...dxe4 36.fxe4 Nd6 37.Rb8+ Ke7 38.f6+! Kd7 39.e5 { White's pawns have moved non-stop in the last moves and are creating a ruckus. } 39...Ne4 40.Kf3! { King must be used as a piece in the endgame } 40...Nc3 41.Kg4 Nd5 42.Rf8 Ke6 43.Rd8 Nf4 44.Be3 { Shakh keeps it simple and pockets the win. } 44...Nd5 45.Bxg5 Nc7 46.Be3 Nd5 47.Bd2 Nc7 48.Kf4 1-0

Final Ranking after 9 Rounds

Rk. SNo Name FED RtgI Pts.  TB1  TB2  TB3  TB4 n w we w-we K rtg+/-
1 3
GM Nakamura Hikaru USA 2844 6,0 0,0 24,75 3 1 9 6 6,00 0,00 20 0,0
2 1
GM Harikrishna Pentala IND 2743 5,5 1,0 24,75 3 1 9 5,5 4,77 0,73 20 14,6
3 8
GM Aronian Levon ARM 2802 5,5 0,0 22,25 3 1 9 5,5 5,48 0,02 20 0,4
4 6
GM So Wesley USA 2808 5,0 0,5 20,75 2 0 9 5 5,57 -0,57 20 -11,4
5 2
GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar AZE 2794 5,0 0,5 19,75 3 0 9 5 5,39 -0,39 20 -7,8
6 7
GM Karjakin Sergey RUS 2792 4,5 0,0 19,75 2 1 9 4,5 5,39 -0,89 20 -17,8
7 5
GM Anand Viswanathan IND 2737 4,0 0,5 19,25 0 0 9 4 4,69 -0,69 20 -13,8
8 9
GM Vidit Santosh Gujrathi IND 2660 4,0 0,5 16,25 2 1 9 4 3,78 0,22 20 4,4
9 4
IM Nihal Sarin IND 2127 3,0 0,0 12,75 0 0 9 3 0,72 2,28 20 45,6
10 10
GM Ganguly Surya Shekhar
Tania Sachdev What happens in the studio..

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