Women’s World Championship: Ju wins with black/Grandelius aims to repeat at TePe Sigeman & Co

Women's World Championship: Ju wins with black

A Sanghajban zajló női világbajnoki döntő második játszmáját a kihívó Ju Wenjun sötéttel 55 lépésben megnyerte. Honfitársnője, a címvédő Tan Zhongyi elleni tízjátszmásra tervezett fináléban 1,5-0,5-re vezet.


Happy Mother's Day 2018:Happy Mothers Day to all the mothers!


Grandelius aims to repeat at TePe Sigeman & Co

Malmőben Gledura az első fordulóban a címvédő svéd Grandeliustól kikapott.

Women's World Championship: Ju wins with black

WCh Women Lviv
Ju, Wenjun - Tan, Zhongyi ½-½ 63 D20 QGA
Tan, Zhongyi - Ju, Wenjun 0-1 55 A21 English Opening
 
WCh Women Lviv (UKR), 2-18 iii 2016
Name Ti NAT Rtng 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Total Perf
Ju, Wenjun g CHN 2571 ½ 1 . . . . . . . . 2715
Tan, Zhongyi g CHN 2522 ½ 0 . . . . . . . . ½ 2378
  The 2018 Women's World Chess Championship has begun in Shanghai, China. In game one we saw a Queens Gambit Accepted that simplified to a drawn endgame, ending in 63 moves. In game two the opening was a seldom seen variation of the English Opening. Ju Wenjun took advantage of the defending champions somewhat timid choice of 3.d3 and scored a win with the black pieces in 55 moves. Live games from 9:00 AM CEST (3:00 AM EDT) | Photo: Gu Xiaobing

Ju Wenjun did muster a smile while leading after two games | Photo: Gu Xiaobing

The first ceremonial move of the 2018 Championship | Photo: Gu Xiaobing

Play resumes on May 6th | Photo: Gu Xiaobing

[Event "Womens World Championship Match 2018"] [Site "Shanghai"] [Date "2018.05.04"] [Round "2"] [White "Tan, Zhongyi"] [Black "Ju, Wenjun"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A21"] [WhiteElo "2522"] [BlackElo "2571"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "110"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [EventCountry "CHN"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Bb4 3. d3 Bxc3+ 4. bxc3 d6 5. g3 f5 6. Bg2 Nf6 7. Rb1 {LiveBook: 3 Games. A21: English Opening: 1...e5 2 Nc3} (7. Nf3 O-O 8. O-O c5 9. Nd2 Nc6 10. f4 Be6 11. e4 exf4 12. Rxf4 Qd7 13. Rb1 Rae8 14. Qf1 fxe4 15. Nxe4 Nxe4 16. Bxe4 b6 {1-0 (45) Krylov,M (2476)-Volovikov,A (2271) Serpukhov 2018}) 7... c6 8. Nf3 Qc7 9. O-O {White has an edge.} O-O 10. Bg5 $146 ({Predecessor:} 10. Qb3 c5 11. Ng5 Nc6 12. Qb5 h6 13. Nh3 Na5 14. f4 e4 { 0-1 (50) Ehlert,H (1923)-Gross,T (2152) Verden 2008}) 10... Nbd7 11. Nd2 h6 12. Bxf6 Nxf6 13. e4 Be6 14. Bh3 Qd7 15. exf5 Bxf5 16. Bxf5 Qxf5 17. Ne4 Qd7 18. Qb3 Nxe4 19. dxe4 Rf7 20. Rfd1 Qg4 21. Rxd6 Qe2 22. Rf1 (22. Qb2 $11 Qxe4 23. c5) 22... Raf8 $1 $17 {[%cal Rf7f2]} 23. c5 {With the idea Rd7.} Kh7 {[%cal Rf7f2]} 24. Qd1 Qxa2 {[%cal Rf7f2]} 25. Qb1 Qc4 $1 26. Rd2 a5 $1 ({Don't do} 26... Qxc3 27. Qc2 $15) ({Don't take} 26... Qxc5 27. Qb4 $17) 27. Qb6 (27. Qc2 $17 {keeps fighting.}) 27... Qxc3 $19 28. Rb2 h5 29. Ra2 {[#]} a4 $1 {[%mdl 512]} 30. Qb2 (30. Rxa4 Rxf2) 30... Qxc5 31. Rxa4 g6 32. Qd2 Kg7 33. Ra5 {[#]} Qd4 $1 {[%cal Rd4d2]} 34. Qxd4 exd4 $17 {[%mdl 4096] Endgame KRR-KRR} 35. f4 Rd8 36. Kf2 b6 (36... Rc7 $17 37. Ke2 c5) 37. Ra6 $11 c5 38. Rxb6 Ra7 39. f5 $2 (39. Rc6 $11) 39... gxf5 $19 40. exf5 d3 {[%cal Bd4d3,Bd3d2][%mdl 32]} 41. Rc6 $2 (41. Rd1) 41... Ra2+ 42. Kf3 d2 43. Rc7+ Kf6 44. Rc6+ Ke7 45. Rd1 {[#]} Rc2 $1 46. h3 c4 {[%cal Bc5c4,Bc4c3][%mdl 32]} 47. g4 hxg4+ 48. hxg4 Rc1 49. Ke2 c3 50. Rc7+ Kf6 {Black mates.} 51. Rc6+ Kg5 52. Kf3 Rg8 ({Weaker is} 52... Rxd1 53. Rg6+ Kh4 54. Rh6+ Kg5 55. Rg6+ Kh4 56. Rh6+ Kg5 57. Rg6+ $11) 53. Ke2 Rh8 54. Rd6 Rxd1 55. Kxd1 Rh1+ {Precision: White = 37%, Black = 69%.} 0-1 [Event "Womens World Championship Match 2018"] [Site "Shanghai"] [Date "2018.05.03"] [Round "1"] [White "Ju, Wenjun"] [Black "Tan, Zhongyi"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D24"] [WhiteElo "2571"] [BlackElo "2522"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "126"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [EventCountry "CHN"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. e4 c5 4. d5 e6 5. Bxc4 Nf6 6. Nc3 exd5 7. exd5 a6 8. a4 Bd6 9. Nf3 O-O 10. O-O Bg4 {D24: Queen's Gambit Accepted: 3 Nf3 Nf6 4 Nc3} (10... h6 11. h3 Bf5 12. Nh4 Bh7 13. Bd3 Be5 14. Bxh7+ Kxh7 15. Qd3+ Kh8 16. Rd1 Nbd7 17. Nf5 Rc8 18. f4 {0-1 (37) Lopez Mulet,I (2305)-Cifuentes Parada,R (2474) Linares 2017}) 11. h3 Bh5 12. Bg5 Re8 {LiveBook: 6 Games} 13. Bd3 Nbd7 $146 {[%cal Bb8d7, Bd7e5,Be5d3][%mdl 32]} ({Predecessor:} 13... Bg6 14. Bxg6 hxg6 15. Nd2 Nbd7 16. Nc4 Nb6 17. Qb3 Nxc4 18. Qxc4 {1/2-1/2 (32) Wong,Y (1959)-Kiss,P (2336) Kecskemet 2015}) 14. Ne4 Ne5 {White should prevent ...Nxf3+.} 15. g4 Nxd3 16. Bxf6 $1 gxf6 17. Qxd3 Bg6 18. Rae1 Qe7 {[%cal Rg6e4]} 19. Nfd2 $1 {[%cal Bf3d2, Bd2c4,Bc4e3][%mdl 32] f4 is the strong threat.} Bf4 20. Qf3 Qe5 {[#]} 21. Re2 ( {White should try} 21. Kg2 $1 $16) 21... f5 $1 $11 {[%cal Rf5e4]} 22. gxf5 Qxf5 23. Rfe1 Re5 24. Nc4 Bh2+ $1 25. Kg2 Qxf3+ 26. Kxf3 Bxe4+ 27. Rxe4 Rxe4 ({ Much weaker is} 27... Rxd5 $6 28. Nb6 $16) 28. Rxe4 {[%mdl 4096] Endgame And now Kg2 would win. KRB-KRN} Rd8 (28... b5 $1 $11 29. Ne3 Kf8) 29. Ne3 b5 30. axb5 axb5 31. Re7 Kf8 32. Ra7 Be5 33. b3 c4 34. bxc4 bxc4 35. Ke4 Re8 36. Kf3 c3 37. Ra6 Rc8 38. Ke4 Bh2 39. Rc6 Rxc6 {The position is equal.} 40. dxc6 { KB-KN} Ke7 41. Nd5+ Kd6 {[#] Hoping for ...c2.} 42. Nxc3 Kxc6 43. Kf5 Bg1 44. Ne4 h6 45. Ke5 Kd7 46. Kf4 {Threatens to win with Kg3.} Bh2+ $1 47. Kf5 Ke7 48. Nf6 Bg1 49. f3 Kf8 50. Nh5 Bb6 51. Kg4 Ba5 52. Ng3 Kg7 53. Kf5 Bc7 54. Nh5+ Kf8 55. f4 Ba5 56. Ke5 Bc7+ 57. Ke4 Ba5 58. Ng3 Kg7 59. Kf5 Bd2 60. Ne4 Be3 61. h4 h5 62. Nd6 f6 63. Ne4 Kf7 {Precision: White = 69%, Black = 70%.} 1/2-1/2

FIDE Women's World Championship 2018 2018-05-03 - 2018-05-19

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Grandelius aims to repeat at TePe Sigeman & Co

In a town rich in history, comes a tournament to match. This year's Sigeman & Co tournament (now co-sponsored by the oral hygiene company Tepe) is the 24th edition and has an interesting mix of six players participating for five days in Malmo, Sweden. Vidit Gujrathi is the top seed, but Alexander Morozevich is sure to garner some attention as he makes a rare appearance in a strong tournament. More young talents, Aryan Tari and Benjamin Gledura join Swedes Nils Grandelius and Linus Johansson to round out the field. The Swedish number one leads after one round. GM TIGER HILLARP PERSSON annotates his win. | Pictured: At the opening dinner, Tari leans towards Vidit as Gledura looks on. | Photos: Macauley Peterson

Knut hall

Nils has the hot hand so far | Photo: Macauley Peterson

Morozevich, sporting his new Wyatt Earp moustache | Photo: Macauley Peterson

[Event "Tepe Sigeman Chess 2018"] [Site "Malmo"] [Date "2018.05.04"] [Round "1"] [White "Grandelius, Nils"] [Black "Gledura, Benjamin"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B22"] [WhiteElo "2651"] [BlackElo "2615"] [Annotator "Tiger"] [PlyCount "71"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 c5 ({Surprise number one, as Gledura usually plays} 1... e5) 2. Nf3 e6 3. c3 {Surpirse number two, as Nils used to play consistent main lines earlier in his career. It seems he has adopted to a world where one is trying, mostly, to get to out of the book, or at least out of the opponent's preparation. Since Black's first move indicates a preparation, Nils steps out of his usual ways.} Nf6 4. e5 Nd5 5. Bc4 b6 {The next surprise and a very rare move. It seems that Gledura is following in the footsteps of his compatriot Richard Rapport, in steering towards (very) unclear and somewhat dubious territory.} ({The main lines are reached with} 5... d6) ({or} 5... Nb6 6. Bb3 d6) 6. d4 Bb7 7. O-O Be7 ({Instinctively I would evaluate} 7... cxd4 8. cxd4 Be7 {as more proper, but Gledura's choice leads to a higher complexity.}) 8. dxc5 $1 {Nils picks up the gauntlet. If White plays anything else, Black "got away" with not taking on d4. } bxc5 9. Nbd2 ({The engines prefer} 9. Na3 O-O 10. Bd3 {, but eventually comes to the realization that} d6 11. Nc4 dxe5 12. Nfxe5 Nd7 {gives Black good dynamic play for a small price (slightly worse pawn structure).}) 9... O-O 10. Ne4 f5 $6 (10... Qc7 11. Re1 Nc6 12. Bg5 $1 (12. Bd3 c4 13. Bc2 Rad8 $132) 12... f6 (12... Bxg5 $6 13. Nexg5 Nf4 14. Qc2 $36) 13. exf6 Nxf6 14. Bd3 { leads to a balanced position, where White has a slight structural advantage in that it is hard for Black to arrange the central pawns in such a way that none is left behind. On the bonus side Black has active pieces and nice play on the f-file.}) 11. Nd6 $5 ({Both players carry out the most ambitious ideas again and again. Here} 11. exf6 Nxf6 12. Nxf6+ Rxf6 13. Ne5 d5 14. Bd3 Nd7 15. Ng4 { would have led to some advantage for White.}) 11... Bxd6 12. exd6 Qf6 ({ In the analysis room Yassir Seirawan and Ferdinand Hellers started looking into } 12... Qb6 {almost immediately and it was also my first choice. The point is that; since the d6-pawn is under threat, White's forces are unable to immediately reach their optimal squares (Ne5, Re1, Bf1), so that Black gets time to develop the knight. In the mean time the c5-pawn is also properly protected.} 13. Qb3 (13. Bb3 {was suggested by the commentators, Hellers and Seirawan, and it is one of the best moves:} Rc8 14. Ne5 Qxd6 15. Re1 Qc7 16. Bg5 $44) (13. Be2 {was my instinctiv "first choice", but Black is doing fine here after} a5 {, followed by Nc6 and Ba6. I would even rather play the black side here.}) 13... Nf6 14. Ne5 Bd5 15. Bxd5 exd5 16. Bf4 {looks like the best try for White, but Black has a few decent defences. One is} Nc6 17. Rfe1 Nxe5 18. Bxe5 Qxb3 19. axb3 Kf7 {which is about equal.}) 13. Re1 $1 {Keeping an eye on e5, while allowing the bishop on c4 to retreat all the way back to f1. The latter is quite important as - which is a usual case when knights play against bishops - the bishop is out of the way and cannot be further attacked by a knight. Nor does it obstruct the rook on the e-file, or end up in limbo on b3.} Nb6 14. Bf1 ({Ferdinand Hellers suggested} 14. Bb5 $5 {which is a move designed to create some disarray in Black's position. After} a6 $6 15. Bf1 { Black has to look out for Qd1-b3}) (14. Be2 {is the engine's first choice, mainly since it turns Bxf3 into a bad move. Still I doubt it is any better than Bf1.}) 14... f4 $5 {This blocks Bc1 out of the game and is the only ambitious move that isn't hopeless. The other (not ambitious) alternative is} ( 14... Bxf3 $1 15. Qxf3 Nc6 {, when White can win a pawn with} 16. Be3 c4 17. Bxb6 axb6 18. Bxc4 Ne5 19. Qe2 Nxc4 20. Qxc4 {. However, after} Rfc8 {the position is quite hard for White to win due to Black's active pieces. An important point is that the d6-pawn is an asset for White when there are many minor pieces on the board, but in this situation it is more of a liability. If the queens come off, it can be attacked with e5, Kg8-f7-e6/Rc6 and before that it keeps d7 from coming under long distance scrutiny.}) 15. a4 $1 {An excellent move that the commentators also came up with. The point is that both bishop and knight need the d5-square, but only one of them can stay there. The downside is that it becomes less attractive for White to play c4 later, since this would give Black access to the d4-square.} Bd5 $2 {This move is far too slow and is Black's reaction to ending up in a position that he is not comfortable with. He would like to play Bd5 before Nc6, but it is a fantasy to be able to do both. Black is behind in development and has to deal with a very insidious pawn on d6, but there is no way to deal with all the problems with one move. So, catching up in development should be the first priority.} (15... Bxf3 {is necessary and after} 16. Qxf3 Nc6 {White, at least, has to worry about the passive position of the bishop on c1. One possible continuation would be} 17. a5 Nd5 18. Ra4 Rab8 19. Bd3 {when, objectively, White is much better, but Black is not without chances.}) 16. a5 $1 {Now Black's pieces all end up in disarray.} Nc8 (16... Nc4 17. Ra4 $1 Nxd6 18. Rxf4 $18) 17. Ra4 g5 18. Ne5 $6 (18. h4 $1 {is stronger and would have finished the game quickly:} h6 19. hxg5 hxg5 20. Ne5 Qg7 21. c4 Bc6 22. Ra3 Rf5 23. Ng4 {followed by Rh3, is game over. However, perhaps Nils saw the line in the game and didn't find a reason to look for a better one.}) 18... Qg7 {Making way for the rook to question the strong knight on e5.} (18... Nxd6 $2 19. c4 Bc6 20. Nxc6 Nxc6 21. Qxd6 $18) 19. c4 $6 {Now it becomes complicated again.} (19. h4 $1 Rf5 20. Bd3 Rxe5 21. Rxe5 Qxe5 22. Qh5 Nxd6 23. Bxf4 {wins by force, but I understand the attraction of keeping things simple.}) 19... Bc6 20. Ra3 ({I was curious about } 20. Bd2 $5 Bxa4 21. Qxa4 Nxd6 22. Bc3 {during the game, and it seems to be quite strong too. The best defence according to the silicon monster is} Qe7 23. Bd3 Nc6 24. Nxc6 dxc6 25. Qxc6 Rad8 26. Qxc5 Nf5 {, but} 27. Qxe7 Nxe7 28. Be2 Nc6 29. Bg4 e5 30. Bf3 {leaves Black in a terrible pickle. No reason to take such chances though.}) ({Another version of the Bd2-c3-idea is} 20. b3 $1 { , which allows White to hang on to the d6-pawn a while longer. After} Bxa4 21. bxa4 Rf5 22. Bb2 Nc6 23. Nxc6 Qxb2 24. Rxe6 $3 Rf8 25. Re2 Qg7 26. Qd5+ Kh8 27. Ne5 Rb8 28. Qxc5 Rb1 29. Qd4 {Black is playing without the knight on c8, so White is basically playing with two minor pieces against a rook.}) 20... Rf5 $1 21. Ng4 h5 22. Bd3 $1 Nxd6 (22... hxg4 23. Bxf5 exf5 24. Re8+ Kf7 25. Rxc8 Na6 26. Rxa8 Bxa8 {at first looks like some kind of compensation for Black, due to the lack of squares for the bishop and rook. However} 27. h3 $1 {is winning for White, since} gxh3 28. Qh5+ Qg6 29. Rxh3 {opens up for the rook to enter on the h-file.}) 23. Bxf5 Nxf5 24. Ne5 h4 $6 {If only Black's knight wasn't on b8, this might be called "compensation for the exchange". It is on b8 though.} ({Here} 24... d6 $1 25. Nxc6 Nxc6 26. Rxe6 (26. Qxh5 $2 Ncd4 $13) 26... Ncd4 27. Re1 Qf7 {looks like a better chance to survive a bit longer, but after} 28. b4 $1 {the end result is not in question.}) 25. Rd3 Nd4 26. b4 $1 d6 27. Ng4 Nd7 {White can take on d4 any time now, but Nils prefers to kick the bishop back first.} 28. b5 Bb7 29. a6 Bc8 30. Rxd4 $1 cxd4 31. Rxe6 Ne5 32. Nf6+ Kf7 33. Rxd6 Be6 34. Ne4 Nxc4 35. Rxd4 {Now Nxg5+ and Nc5 are threatened.} Rc8 { This stops Nc5, but allows} 36. Rd7+ {Black resigned.} 1-0

Aryan Tari, Vidit Santosh Gujrathi

[Event "Tepe Sigeman Chess 2018"] [Site "Malmo"] [Date "2018.05.04"] [Round "1"] [White "Tari, Aryan"] [Black "Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B45"] [WhiteElo "2603"] [BlackElo "2707"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "88"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [EventCountry "SWE"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Nxc6 bxc6 7. e5 Nd5 8. Ne4 Qc7 9. f4 Qb6 10. c4 Bb4+ 11. Ke2 f5 12. exf6 Nxf6 {B45: Sicilian Four Knights} 13. Be3 Qd8 14. Nd6+ Bxd6 15. Qxd6 Bb7 (15... Qe7 16. Bc5 Qf7 17. Ke3 g5 18. Be2 g4 19. Rac1 h5 20. Rc3 Qg7 21. Bd3 Kf7 22. Kd2 Re8 23. Re1 Qh6 24. Kc2 a5 25. Re5 Nh7 26. Rf5+ Kg8 27. Qe5 {1-0 (27) Vidit,S (2718)-Krasenkow,M (2671) Wijk aan Zee 2018}) 16. Kd1 c5 17. Qxc5 {LiveBook: 3 Games} ({But not} 17. Bxc5 Ne4 $15) 17... Be4 18. Rg1 $146 ({Predecessor:} 18. b3 Rc8 19. Qd4 d5 20. Kc1 {0-1 (53) Fakhrutdinov,T (2429)-Iljiushenok,I (2519) Khanty-Mansiysk 2017}) 18... d6 19. Qd4 O-O 20. Be2 Qe8 21. Ke1 e5 22. fxe5 $1 dxe5 23. Qc5 Bc6 24. Rd1 Ne4 ({Black should play} 24... a5 $11) 25. Qa3 $14 a5 {[#]} 26. Rf1 $1 Qg6 27. Rxf8+ Rxf8 28. Bf3 Qf6 29. Qd3 Qh4+ {The position is equal.} 30. Ke2 $1 Nc3+ 31. Qxc3 (31. bxc3 $2 e4 $17) 31... e4 32. Bxe4 Bxe4 33. Kd2 Qxh2 34. Kc1 Qxg2 35. Rg1 Rf1+ 36. Rxf1 Qxf1+ 37. Kd2 Qg2+ 38. Ke1 Qh1+ 39. Kd2 Qg2+ 40. Ke1 $1 h5 41. Qxa5 Qh1+ 42. Kd2 Qg2+ 43. Ke1 Qh1+ 44. Kd2 Qg2+ {Precision: White = 72%, Black = 58%.} 1/2-1/2
[Event "Tepe Sigeman Chess 2018"] [Site "Malmo"] [Date "2018.05.04"] [Round "1"] [White "Johansson, Linus"] [Black "Morozevich, Alexander"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A07"] [WhiteElo "2457"] [BlackElo "2665"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "89"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [EventCountry "SWE"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] 1. Nf3 g6 2. g3 Bg7 3. Bg2 e5 4. d3 d5 5. O-O Ne7 6. e4 d4 7. c3 {A07: Réti Opening: New York and Capablanca Systems} (7. a4 c5 8. Na3 Nbc6 9. c3 h6 10. cxd4 cxd4 11. Bd2 O-O 12. b4 Bg4 13. Nc4 Rc8 14. b5 Nb8 {1-0 (33) Le,Q (2703) -Ponomariov,R (2731) Beijing 2013}) 7... dxc3 8. bxc3 O-O 9. Na3 {The position is equal.} c5 10. Be3 b6 11. d4 Ba6 $146 ({Predecessor:} 11... cxd4 12. cxd4 Bg4 13. d5 Nc8 14. Qb3 Nd6 {1-0 (38) Djosic,S (2240)-Mrdakovic,O Sabac 2014}) 12. Re1 (12. Nxe5 {seems wilder.} cxd4 13. cxd4 Bxf1 14. Qxf1 a6 15. Rd1) 12... exd4 13. cxd4 cxd4 14. Bxd4 Nbc6 {[%cal Rc6d4]} 15. Bxg7 Qxd1 $1 16. Raxd1 Kxg7 17. Bf1 Bc8 18. Kg2 Rd8 19. Nb5 h6 20. Rxd8 Nxd8 21. Nfd4 Ne6 22. Rc1 Nxd4 23. Nxd4 Bb7 24. f3 {[#] Threatens to win with Rc7.} Rc8 25. Rxc8 Nxc8 $14 { [%mdl 4096] Endgame KBN-KBN} 26. Kf2 Ne7 27. Ke3 f5 28. e5 f4+ $2 (28... Nd5+ $14 29. Kd2 Nc7) 29. Kxf4 $18 ({Not} 29. gxf4 Nd5+ 30. Kd2 Nxf4 $11) 29... Nd5+ 30. Ke4 Nb4+ 31. Ke3 Nxa2 32. Ne6+ Kg8 {[#]} 33. Nd8 $2 (33. Bd3 $1 $16) 33... Bd5 $11 34. Kd4 Nb4 35. f4 a5 36. Bc4 Bxc4 37. Kxc4 {KN-KN} Nc2 38. h3 a4 39. Nc6 b5+ 40. Kd3 ({Don't blunder} 40. Kxb5 $2 a3 $19) 40... Na3 $1 41. Nd4 b4 42. Nc2 $1 {[%cal Rc2a3]} Nxc2 43. Kxc2 Kf7 44. g4 (44. Kb2 $11 {keeps the balance.}) 44... Ke6 $17 45. h4 {Precision: White = 60%, Black = 59%.} 1/2-1/2
4th Sigeman & Co 2018 Malmo SWE (SWE), 4-8 v 2018 cat. XV (2616)
1 2 3 4 5 6
1. Grandelius, Nils g SWE 2651 * . . . . 1 1
2. Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi g IND 2707 . * . ½ . . ½ 2603
3. Morozevich, Alexander g RUS 2665 . . * . ½ . ½ 2457
4. Tari, Aryan g NOR 2603 . ½ . * . . ½ 2707
5. Johansson, Linus m SWE 2457 . . ½ . * . ½ 2665
6. Gledura, Benjamin g HUN 2615 0 . . . . * 0
Round 1 (May 4, 2018)
Grandelius, Nils - Gledura, Benjamin 1-0 36 B40 Sicilian Classical
Tari, Aryan - Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi ½-½ 44 B40 Sicilian Classical
Johansson, Linus - Morozevich, Alexander ½-½ 45 A07 Barcza System
  TEPE SIGEMAN & CO CHESS TOURNAMENT 4-8 May 2018 - Malmö, Sweden

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