Tata Steel Chess january 24, 2021 Round8

Tata Steel Chess january 24, 2021 Round8

Firouzja egyedül áll a mezőny élén egy négyes üldöző boly előtt  – A kilencedik fordulóban  a két tinédzser Firouza – Esipenko parti lesz.

After losing to Carlsen in Round 1, Firouzja goes into the 2nd rest day as the sole leader, while Magnus is down in 8th place! Alireza plays a certain Esipenko on Tuesday…

This is – Carlsen’s 6th loss in the top group of #TataSteelChess: – First loss in the event since ’17, having scored +16 =35 -0 in that period. – His first loss vs sub-2700 opposition since 2015.

Kedden a kilencedik fordulóval folytatódik a verseny.

Monday, January 25, 2021 Rest day 05:00 14:00

Tuesday, January 26, 2021 Round 9 05:00 14:00

Wednesday, January 27, 2021 Round 10 05:00 14:00

Thursday, January 28, 2021 Rest day 05:00 14:00

Friday, January 29, 2021 Round 11 05:00 14:00

Saturday, January 30, 2021 Round 12 05:00 14:00

Sunday, January 31, 2021 Round 13 04:00 13:00

 

In this picture, made during Tal Memorial 2013, 11-year-old Andrey Esipenko is standing next to the soon-to-be world champion Magnus Carlsen.

Reminder that these were Carlsen’s achievements by the time he was 17:

Firouzja Rapport szomszédja a world topban

Firouzja has also crossed 2760 and is up to world no. 14, with the Top 10 a realistic goal this event, while Esipenko is knocking on the door of the 2700 club on 2696! https://2700chess.com/?per-page=100 #TataSteelChess

Magnus Carlsen

Had a very unpleasant experience at the playing hall today, felt like a swab was being shoved into my nostril and all the way inside my brain, causing a lot of pain. Covid test after the game was not that bad though

Esipenko telling 2sjakk: “I feel good. I have beaten Magnus Carlsen. It’s a special day for me.”TataSteelChess

Esipenko mondja 2sjakk : “Jól érzem magam. Megvertem Magnus Carlsent. Ez egy különleges nap

[Event “83rd Tata Steel Masters 2021”] [Site “Wijk aan Zee”] [Date “2021.01.24”] [Round “8.1”] [White “Esipenko, Andrey”] [Black “Carlsen, Magnus”] [Result “1-0”] [ECO “B84”] [WhiteElo “2677”] [BlackElo “2862”] [Annotator “TA”] [PlyCount “75”] [EventDate “2021.01.16”] [EventType “tourn”] [EventCountry “NED”] [Tiebreak “Koya+Number of wins”] [SourceTitle “playchess.com”] [Source “ChessBase”] [SourceQuality “1”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be2 e6 7. Be3 {7.f4 is becoming the main line.} Be7 8. g4 b5 {B84: Sicilian Scheveningen: 6 Be2 a6, lines without early Be3.} 9. g5 Nfd7 10. a3 Bxg5 { The position is equal.} 11. Qd2 Bxe3 12. Qxe3 {[#]} Qh4 $146 (12… Qe7 $11) ({ Predecessor:} 12… Bb7 13. O-O-O Qe7 14. Nb3 Nc6 15. Qg3 Nc5 16. Nxc5 dxc5 17. Qxg7 Rf8 18. Bg4 Nd4 {1/2-1/2 (32) Frotscher,T (2363)-Gomila Marti,S (2375) ICCF email 2019}) 13. Rg1 {[%mdl 1024] White has compensation.} g6 14. O-O-O Qe7 15. f4 Bb7 16. Kb1 Nc6 {White leaves nothing to chance now.} (16… Nc5 $1 $14) 17. Ncxb5 $1 $16 axb5 18. Nxc6 Bxc6 19. Qc3 $1 {[%csl LRc6,LRh8][%mdl 64] Double Attack} O-O 20. Qxc6 {[%mdl 64] Double Attack} d5 21. exd5 (21. Bxb5 $6 Nf6 $14) 21… Rfc8 {[#]} 22. d6 $1 $36 {[%mdl 2560] White has strong initiative.} Qd8 23. Qxb5 Rcb8 24. Qc4 Rxa3 {And now …Qa5 would win.} 25. Qc7 Qe8 (25… Ra4 $16) 26. Rg5 $1 $18 {Bb5 is the strong threat.} Ra4 27. Ra5 (27. Bb5 $2 Rxb5 $1 28. Rxb5 Qa8 $1 $17) 27… Rab4 {[#]} 28. b3 R4b7 29. Qc3 Qd8 30. Bf3 Rb4 31. Qc7 Qf6 $2 (31… Rc8 32. Ra8 Rxa8 33. Bxa8 Qxa8) 32. Ra8 (32. Qxd7 $2 {[#] leads to mate.} Rxb3+ $1 {[%mdl 512]} 33. cxb3 Rxb3+ 34. Kc2 Qc3#) 32… Rxa8 33. Bxa8 Qf5 {aiming for …Rxb3+.} 34. Kb2 ({Not} 34. Qxd7 $2 Rxb3+ 35. Kc1 Qxf4+ 36. Rd2 Ra3 $19) 34… Rb5 {Black wants to play …Rc5.} 35. Qxd7 {Strongly threatening Qe8+.} Rc5 36. Rc1 Qxf4 37. Qe8+ Kg7 {Threatening …Qd2. } 38. d7 {Weighted Error Value: White=0.14/Black=0.36} 1-0

 

[Event “Tata Steel Masters”] [Site “Wijk aan Zee”] [Date “2021.01.24”] [Round “8.1”] [White “Esipenko, Andrey”] [Black “Carlsen, Magnus”] [Result “1-0”] [ECO “B84”] [WhiteElo “2677”] [BlackElo “2862”] [Annotator “Bojkov,Dejan”] [PlyCount “75”] [EventDate “2021.??.??”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be2 e6 7. Be3 Be7 {Black often delays this move in these Sicilians, trying to get some space and play on the opposite wing first (or in the center.)} 8. g4 {A sharp attacking continuation against the Scheveningen in the spirit of the Keres Attack..} 8… b5 {A very risky move that the world champion executed after more than 12 minutes spent on his clock. The last time this was tried was back in 2016.} ({A recent grandmaster game saw an even sharper development after} 8… Nfd7 9. Qd2 b5 10. a3 Bb7 11. O-O-O Nc6 12. g5 Nxd4 13. Qxd4 Bxg5 14. Rhg1 Bxe3+ 15. Qxe3 Qb6 16. Qg3 Ne5 17. f4 Ng6 18. f5 Ne5 19. fxe6 fxe6 20. Qxg7 O-O-O {Tarlev,K (2564)-Saric,I (2650) Germany 2019}) ({Eight years back in Norway, Veselin Topalov played in accordance with the classical principles and struck in the center:} 8… d5 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxd5 Qxd5 11. Bf3 Qa5+ 12. Qd2 Qxd2+ 13. Bxd2 Nd7 {comfortably holding the endgame in Nakamura,H (2775)-Topalov,V (2793) Stavanger 2013}) 9. g5 {Esipenko, in turn, plays quickly and confidently.} 9… Nfd7 10. a3! {Played without any hesitation. It is far more important to stabilize the center than to care for the g5-pawn. White is often sacrificing it anyway whenever the opponent castles kingside, for instance.} ({After} 10. Qd2 Bb7 (10… b4 11. Nd1 Nc5 {might be even more interesting.}) 11. a3 Nb6 12. b3 N8d7 13. f4 Rc8 14. Bf3 Qc7 15. Nce2 g6 16. c3 Nc5 {Black achieved a harmonious position in Ashiku,F (2139)-Ten Hertog,H (2318) Albena 2011}) 10… Bxg5 {Again hesitation. But what else?} ({After} 10… Bb7 11. Rg1 Qc7 12. f4 {White has an excellent attacking position for free.}) 11. Qd2 Bxe3 ({Esipenko no doubt knew the following masterpiece:} 11… Bf6 12. O-O-O Bb7 13. Rhg1 Nc5 14. e5!! {In the best defended spot!} 14… Bxe5 (14… dxe5 15. Ndxb5! {would not have changed anything.}) 15. Ndxb5! Nb3+ (15… axb5 16. Bxc5) 16. cxb3 axb5 17. Bxb5+ Bc6 18. Bd4 Qc8 19. Bxe5 dxe5 20. Kb1 Rg8 21. Ne4 {1-0 Ivanchuk,V (2739)-Negi,P (2634) Peristeri 2010}) 12. Qxe3 {For the pawn, the young Russian GM has a significant lead in the development and a lot of open files to work on. The pawns on d6 and g7 are particularly interesting for White.} 12… Qh4 N {This is also hard to explain. Carlsen is lagging in development, so why not develop pieces? And who is going to defend the d6-pawn now?} ({An email game saw the more reasonable} 12… Bb7 13. O-O-O Qe7 14. Nb3 Nc6 15. Qg3 Nc5 16. Nxc5 dxc5 17. Qxg7 Rf8 18. Bg4 Nd4 19. Ne2 O-O-O {Frotscher,T (2363)-Gomila Marti,S (2375) ICCF email 2019}) 13. Rg1 {Of course! White is not afraid of losing the h2-pawn.} 13… g6 ({In fact, in the line} 13… Qxh2 14. Rxg7 Qh1+ {he has a spectacular win:} 15. Kd2!! Qxa1 16. Nxe6! fxe6 17. Qg5 {with mate.}) ({Understandably, Black does not want to castle under an attack:} 13… O-O 14. O-O-O) 14. O-O-O Qe7 15. f4 {The central breaks are in the air.} 15… Bb7 16. Kb1 {A cunning move. White often does this prophylaxis in the Sicilian, but here it is more venomous than it seems, and it sets a nasty trap.} ({Other logical and strong continuations are} 16. h4) ({Or} 16. e5 {with the idea} 16… d5 17. f5! {to reach the black king as quick as possible.}) 16… Nc6 {Carlsen falls for it!} ({We know why he does not want to castle:} 16… O-O 17. h4 {Many files will be opened against his king in a flash.}) ({However, the preliminary} 16… Nc5 {is a must and only after} 17. Bf3 Nc6 {True, even here Black’s position remains suspicious, to say the least, after} 18. e5 d5 19. Bxd5! {A sacrifice which Black cannot accept:} 19… exd5 20. Nxd5 {as the queen does not have a reasonable square.}) 17. Ncxb5! {That’s it! After the forcing…} 17… axb5 18. Nxc6 Bxc6 19. Qc3! {which apparently Black missed, the world champion can already resign on move 19. An exceptional case in his practice.} 19… O-O 20. Qxc6 d5 {Trying to complicate as much as possible.} ({Nothing changes} 20… Nc5 21. Qxd6 Qa7 22. Qd4) 21. exd5 Rfc8 22. d6! {But Esipenko is very accurate.} 22… Qd8 (22… Rxc6 23. dxe7 {promotes.}) 23. Qxb5 {This looks risky, but it was very carefully calculated.} ({A more careful player would have chosen} 23. Qe4 {but the young Russian has it all covered.}) 23… Rcb8 24. Qc4 Rxa3 {For the moment, it seems as the world champion might muddy the waters, however…} 25. Qc7 Qe8 26. Rg5! {A nice, decisive maneuver that aims to trade one of the enemy rooks, thus killing all of the attack.} 26… Ra4 ({Since} 26… Rc8 {is refuted by} 27. bxa3!) 27. Ra5 Rab4 28. b3 R4b7 ({After} 28… Rc8 {the neatest win is} 29. Bb5! Rxc7 30. dxc7 {when the pawn cannot be stopped.}) 29. Qc3 {The attack is over before it even began. Esipenko comfortably finishes the battle.} 29… Qd8 30. Bf3 Rb4 31. Qc7 Qf6 32. Ra8 {Finally achieving his goal.} 32… Rxa8 33. Bxa8 Qf5 34. Kb2 Rb5 35. Qxd7 Rc5 36. Rc1 Qxf4 37. Qe8+ Kg7 38. d7 1-0

[Event “83rd Tata Steel Masters 2021”] [Site “Wijk aan Zee”] [Date “2021.01.24”] [Round “8.3”] [White “Harikrishna, Pentala”] [Black “Firouzja, Alireza”] [Result “0-1”] [ECO “D10”] [WhiteElo “2732”] [BlackElo “2749”] [Annotator “TA”] [PlyCount “112”] [EventDate “2021.01.16”] [EventType “tourn”] [EventCountry “NED”] [Tiebreak “Koya+Number of wins”] [SourceTitle “playchess.com”] [Source “ChessBase”] [SourceQuality “1”] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. cxd5 cxd5 4. Bf4 Nc6 5. e3 Bf5 6. Bb5 {D10: Slav Defence: 3 cxd5 (without early Nf3) and 3 Nc3.} e6 7. Nc3 Nge7 $5 {[%mdl 4] [#] Leaves trodden paths.} 8. Rc1 $146 {The position is equal.} ({Predecessor:} 8. Nf3 a6 9. Be2 Nc8 10. O-O Be7 11. Rc1 Nb6 12. Ne5 Nxe5 13. Bxe5 O-O 14. Qb3 {1/2-1/2 (30) Ubilava,E (2560) -Komljenovic,D (2495) San Sebastian 1992}) 8… a6 9. Be2 f6 10. g4 Bg6 11. Nf3 Bf7 12. Bg3 h5 13. g5 Ng6 (13… h4 $1 $11 14. Nxh4 (14. Bxh4 Nf5 $11) 14… fxg5) 14. gxf6 (14. h4 $1 $16) 14… h4 $11 15. fxg7 Bxg7 16. Be5 Ngxe5 17. dxe5 Nxe5 18. Nd4 Rc8 19. O-O Nc6 20. Bg4 Nxd4 21. exd4 Rc6 22. Ne2 h3 ({ Black should play} 22… Qg5 $15 23. h3 Rxc1 24. Qxc1 Qxc1 25. Rxc1 Kd7) 23. Rc3 Rh4 24. Rg3 Qc7 25. Re1 Kf8 26. Qd3 e5 27. Qa3+ Qd6 28. Qxd6+ Rxd6 29. Bxh3 exd4 30. Nc1 Rdh6 31. Bg2 Rxh2 32. Nd3 R2h5 33. f4 (33. Nc5 $11) 33… Rc6 $17 34. Bf3 Rhh6 35. Rg2 Rhg6 (35… Rh3 $17 36. Rf1 Bh6) 36. f5 Rh6 37. Nf4 $2 ( 37. Rh2 $1 $15) 37… d3 $1 $19 38. Nxd3 Bd4+ 39. Nf2 Rc2 40. Kf1 Rxb2 41. Re2 Rb1+ 42. Re1 Rhb6 43. Nd3 Bc3 44. Rxb1 Rxb1+ 45. Kf2 Ke7 46. Rh2 Kf6 47. Ke3 Kg5 (47… Rf1 $17 48. Rh7 b5) 48. Nc5 {[#]} ({Better is} 48. Rh7 $15 d4+ { [%mdl 64] Discovered Attack} 49. Kf2) 48… Rb5 ({Much less strong is} 48… Kxf5 49. Bxd5 Re1+ 50. Kd3 $15) ({Black should try} 48… b6 $1 $19 {[%cal Rb6c5]} 49. Nd7 Kxf5) 49. Rh7 $17 Bg8 50. Rc7 Kxf5 {White must now prevent … d4+.} 51. Nxb7 $2 {[#]} (51. Kd3 $17 Be5 52. Rc8) 51… d4+ $1 $19 {[%mdl 64] Discovered Attack} 52. Kf2 $2 (52. Kd3 Rb2 53. Rxc3 dxc3 54. Kxc3 Rxa2 55. Bd1) 52… Rb2+ 53. Be2 (53. Kg1 $142 Kf4 54. Bg2) 53… Kf4 54. Nd6 Bd2 (54… Be6 $142 55. Rb7 Rd2) 55. Kf1 Rb1+ 56. Bd1 d3 {Weighted Error Value: White=0.55/ Black=0.25} 0-1

Ah, and must also be Carlsen’s first loss against a teenager since 16 year old Giri beat him in Wijk aan Zee in 2011

 

Winning scores in TataSteelChess: 2020: 10 (Caruana) 2019: 9 (Carlsen) 2018: 9 (Carlsen *) 2017: 8 (So) 2016: 9 (Carlsen) 2015: 9 (Carlsen) 2014: 8 (Aronian) 2013: 10 (Carlsen) 2012: 9 (Aronian) 2011: 9 (Nakamura)

 


18-year-old Andrey Esipenko crushes World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen in their first classical game in one of the most spectacular upsets in Wijk aan Zee since Anish Giri beat Magnus in 2011!

18-year-old Andrey Esipenko crushes World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen in their first classical game in one of the most spectacular upsets in Wijk aan Zee since Anish Giri beat Magnus in 2011!

83rd Tata Steel 2021 (Wijk aan Zee NED) INFO LIVE RESULTS PGN